Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am learning how to make a Julia Set fractal. I am using this as a reference.

I know the math theory behind it very well. I can compute it manually, too. However, what I do not understand is how it is being done in the program mentioned in the reference.

The author has certain variables that determine the zoom and displacement and he performs some calculations on it.

Can someone please explain what they are ?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's take a look at this line (the one below it works the same way):

newRe = (x - w / 2) / (0.5 * zoom * w) + moveX;

(Ignore the lack of 1.5 factor, that's just there to make sure it doesn't look "squished.")

It's in a for loop that assigns values between 0 and w to x.[1] So the leftmost and rightmost newRe values are going to be:

  • Leftmost:

    newRe = (0 - w / 2) / (0.5 * zoom * w) + moveX;
          = -(w / 2) / w / 0.5 / zoom + moveX;
          = -(1 / 2) / 0.5 / zoom + moveX;
          = -1 / zoom + moveX;
    
  • Rightmost:

    newRe = (w - w / 2) / (0.5 * zoom * w) + moveX;
          = (w / 2) / w / 0.5 / zoom + moveX;
          = (1 / 2) / 0.5 / zoom + moveX;
          = 1 / zoom + moveX;
    

Their difference -- that is, the width of the actual rectangle of the Julia fractal being displayed -- is equal to:

  (1 / zoom + moveX) - (-1 / zoom + moveX)
= (1 / zoom) - (-1 / zoom)
= 2 / zoom

(This whole calculation also works for newIm, h, and moveY.)

This is why increasing zoom causes the rectangle we're examining to shrink -- which is exactly what "zooming in" is.

[1] It actually only goes to w-1, but that one-pixel difference makes this calculation a whole lot more difficult.

share|improve this answer
    
He is basically mapping the pixels to a cartesian coordinate system, right ? – Little Child Jun 12 '13 at 7:23
    
Yup. The x and y values in the for loops are pixel coordinates, which are mapped to newRe and newIm using this method. – Lynn Jun 12 '13 at 7:24
1  
Yeah, here's a simple example of such a mapping: codepad.org/gWtOSWK5 – Lynn Jun 12 '13 at 7:32
    
moveX and moveY just allow us to stroll around in the fractal world, right ?? – Little Child Jun 12 '13 at 7:32
1  
Exactly! They're just added to newRe and newIm after the "resizing" to Cartesian coordinates. – Lynn Jun 12 '13 at 7:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.