Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to combine multiple JSON objects into a single one in PHP. I'm iterating through the JSON objets, decoding them, parsing out the parts I want to keep, and storing them in a property in my php class.

Supposing my json objects look like the following format:

{
    "lists" : {
        "list" : [
            {
                "termA" : 2 ,
                "termB" : "FOO" 
            } 
        ] 
    } 
}

I want to eventually combine everything into a JSON object like so.

{
    "lists" : {
        "list" : [
            {
                "termA" : 2 ,
                "termB" : "FOO" 
            },
            {
                "termA" : 2 ,
                "termB" : "FOO" 
            } 
        ] 
    } ,
    "lists" : {
        "list" : [
            {
                "termA" : 4 ,
                "termB" : "BAR" 
            },
            {
                "termA" : 4 ,
                "termB" : "BAR" 
            } 
        ] 
    } 
}

I'm trying to store Arrays in a property within my class in a function that gets called iteratrivley:

   private function parseData($json){
    	$decodeData = json_decode($json);
            $list = $decodeData->lists;
    	$this->output .= $list
    }

However I get the following error during the "$this->output .= $list" line.

Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string

Right now $this->output has no initial value. What might be the best way to store the "list" arrays temporarily, and then reformat them after going through all of the json objects?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You were close:

private function parseData($json){
  $decodeData = json_decode($json);
  $list = $decodeData['lists'];
  $this->output .= $list
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes you were very close indeed! cletus was even closer –  Yuck Nov 10 '09 at 6:59
{
    "lists" : {
      ...
    } ,
    "lists" : {
      ...
    } 
}

That's not valid/meaningful JSON. You have a hash with the same key (lists) in it twice. How would you address that?

share|improve this answer
    
i'm new to json, why does it validate here jsonlint.com ? –  minimalpop Nov 10 '09 at 14:39
    
Because jsonlint is insufficient? The restriction is not syntactic, so that's probably why. See: rfc-4627, section 2.2 for the definition (Or think about it twice - It's quite intuitive). –  troelskn Nov 10 '09 at 20:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.