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I need to count the records within value ranges.

For example: for the set 1, 7, 9, 23, 33, 35, 1017

select count(myvalue) group by round(myvalue / 10) gives something like:

0-10  -> 3
10-20 -> 0
20-30 -> 1
30-40 -> 2
1010-1020 -> 1

This works fine. However, I need to set an upper limit, so that MySQL returns 40+ --> 1 ? How can this be achieved ?

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can either sum the values on the client side or use two queries, possibly with union, to fetch the data, e.g.:

select round(myvalue / 10), count(myvalue) from table where myvalue < 40 group by round(myvalue / 10)
union
select '40+', count(myvalue) from table where myvalue >= 40

It is absolutely possible to write it in a single query with subqueries or convoluted conditions but it just wouldn't be as simple and maintainable.

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I just hoped that was a way to define an upper and lower limit (e.g. 20- / 40+) for doing the query in a generic manner. – thelost Jun 13 '13 at 11:36
select t.myvalue as [range], count(*) as [occurences]
from (
      select myvalue,
         case when myvalue >= 0 and myvalue< 10 then '0-9'
         when myvalue >= 10 and myvalue< 20 then '10-19'
         when myvalue >= 20 and myvalue< 20 then '20-29'
         when myvalue >= 30 and myvalue< 40 then '30-39'
         else '40+' end as range
     from t) t
group by t.myvalue
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It did not worked any idea? SELECT t.salary as range, count(*) as num_employee FROM (SELECT salary, CASE WHEN salary < = 50000 THEN 'Lowest' WHEN salary > 50000 and salary < = 70000 THEN 'Medium' ELSE 'Highest' END AS RANGE FROM employee_salary) t GROUP BY t.salary – atjoshi Jul 30 '14 at 19:10

I would suggest this solution that borrows from both pilsetnieks and Jayram's solutions:

SELECT
    COUNT(*) AS cnt,
    IF (myvalue >= 40; -1; ROUND(myvalue / 10) AS range
FROM t
GROUP BY range
share|improve this answer
    
At least in MySQL, range is a reserved word: 9.3 Reserved Words – berliner Feb 11 '15 at 15:13

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