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I have a sequence of objects, that each have a sequence number that goes from 0 to ushort.MaxValue (0-65535). I have at max about 10 000 items in my sequence, so there should not be any duplicates, and the items are mostly sorted due to the way they are loaded. I only need to access the data sequentially, I don't need them in a list, if that can help. It is also something that is done quite frequently, so it cannot have a too high Big-O.

What is the best way to sort this list?

An example sequence could be (in this example, assume the sequence number is a single byte and wraps at 255):

240 241 242 243 244 250 251 245 246 248 247 249 252 253 0 1 2 254 255 3 4 5 6

The correct order would then be

240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 

I have a few different approaches, including making a array of ushort.MaxValue size, and just incrementing the position, but that seems like a very inefficient way, and I have some problems when the data I receive have a jump in sequence. However, it's O(1) in performance..

Another approach is to order the items normally, then find the split (6-240), and move the first items to the end. But I'm not sure if that is a good idea.

My third idea is to loop the sequence, until I find a wrong sequence number, look ahead until I find the correct one, and move it to its correct position. However, this can potentially be quite slow if there is a wrong sequence number early on.

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The important number in your example appears to be 88 and not 100. How might one obtain the 88? –  Matthew Watson Jun 12 '13 at 9:04
    
I don't understand what you mean? I load a sequence of objects from somewhere. It's not really important for the question, but it's from files on a local drive. Those objects have a sequence number ranging from 0 to 65535. The sequence number after 65535 is 0 again, as the uint has wrapped around. In the example I assume, for simplicity, that the wraparound is 100. (easier to read than 65530 65531 65532 0 1 2 65533 65534 etc...) In the example, the first object have a sequence number of 88. –  AkselK Jun 12 '13 at 9:10
    
What I mean is that you are considering numbers >= 88 to be before numbers < 88. In this case, the value of 100 isn't useful. I guess I'm misunderstanding the source data. –  Matthew Watson Jun 12 '13 at 9:14
    
I can have a millions of objects, but are limited to a ushort for sequence numbering. However, I only work on small subsets. So this isn't sorting numbers, it sorting a cyclic sequence. When the sequence number wraps to 0, the number is < 88, as you say, but in the sequence order, it's after 88. 100 is the place where it wraps over. (In the example, that is.) Would it be clearer if I used byte, and wrapped over at 255, in the example? Perhaps it would. –  AkselK Jun 12 '13 at 9:27

2 Answers 2

Is this what you are looking for?

var groups = ints.GroupBy(x => x < 255 / 2)
     .OrderByDescending(list => list.ElementAt(0))
     .Select(x => x.OrderBy(u => u))
     .SelectMany(i => i).ToList(); 

Example In:

int[] ints = new int[] { 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 0, 1, 2, 3, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 99, 100, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 };

Out:

88 89 90 91 92 92 93 94 95 96 97 99 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

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No. Because this only works for THIS VERY EXAMPLE. I'm looking for an algorithm that works when the wrap around is at 65535. Am I really that bad at asking questions? :( –  AkselK Jun 12 '13 at 10:05
    
Besides, this wouldn't even work when you are in the range 40-60... –  AkselK Jun 12 '13 at 10:05
    
so change the 50 to a variable?.. if the wrap around is 65535 then the 50 should be 65535/2 –  Sayse Jun 12 '13 at 10:10
    
I don't think you understand. When it does not wrap around, I only need to sort it. Your method does not sort it. In fact, when it reaches the middle point, 50 (or any number, really), it just splits and reverses the array. –  AkselK Jun 12 '13 at 10:13
    
When it does not wrap around there will only be one array in the group. I don't think you understand this code –  Sayse Jun 12 '13 at 10:19

I realise this is an old question byte I also needed to do this and would have liked an answer so...

Use a SortedSet<FileData> with a custom comparer;

where FileData contains information about the files you are working with e.g.

struct FileData
{
    public ushort SequenceNumber;
    ...
}

internal class Sequencer : IComparer<FileData>
{
    public int Compare(FileData x, FileData y)
    {
        ushort comparer = (ushort)(x.SequenceNumber - y.SequenceNumber);
        if (comparer == 0) return 0;
        if (comparer < ushort.MaxValue / 2) return 1;
        return -1;
    }
}

As you read file information from disk add them to your SortedSet

When you read them out of the SortedSet they are now in the correct order

Note that the SortedSet uses a Red-Black Internally which should give you a nice balance between performance and memory

Insertion is O(log n)
Traversal is O(n)

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