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My file contains an apostrophe (). I am able to see this character if the file opens in Windows but not able to see it if the file opens in Unix. But I need to use that file once after removing that character.

I can't use windows to remove the character manually. My servers are Unix so I need to remove the character at that point. I have tried the following but it didn't work.

cat HAllResponses_11004*.txt| sed 's/’/'/g;'>HAllResponses_11004_1.txt
  1. How to identify that character if that character is not appearing.
  2. How to replace that character if that character is not appering.

Your 3 Answers are not helping me to resolve the issue. when i use hexa values it is giving as below.

$ echo -e "compilin\xe2\x80\x99 my program"

compilinâ my program

The problem is when i paste apostrophe in unix, it is appearing as '.'

Pl help me

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Did you try what I've suggested? –  Amit Jun 13 '13 at 16:52

3 Answers 3

The character is different from the ' character. To see that more clearly, inspect their hexadecimal value:

echo -n ’ | hexdump -C
00000000  e2 80 99                                          |...|
00000003
echo -n \' | hexdump -C
00000000  27                                                |'|
00000001

Now the can be identified by its hex value when using sed or similar tools for replacing it inside a sequence:

echo -e "compilin\xe2\x80\x99 my program"
compilin’ my program
echo -e "compilin\xe2\x80\x99 my program" | sed "s|\xe2\x80\x99|'|"
compilin' my program

This will replace the apostrophe character only if it occurs in the text. In your case simply pass the filename as the second argument to sed and you're done:

sed -i "s|\xe2\x80\x99|'|" HAllResponses_11004_1.txt

or just:

sed -i "s|’|'|" HAllResponses_11004_1.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Your 3 Answers are not helping me to resolve the issue. when i use hexa values it is giving as below. $ echo -e "compilin\xe2\x80\x99 my program" compilinâ my program The problem is when i paste apostrophe in unix, it is appearing as '.' Pl help me –  user2471320 Jun 13 '13 at 11:28

You can use cat -vet to see the control characters in unix and then use sed to replace those characters. In the example below, cat -vet shows (') as (M-^R) which can be easliy replaced using sed.

Original File:

My file contains an apostrophe (’). I am able to see this character if the file opens in Windows but not able to see it if the file opens in Unix. But I need to use that file once after removing that character.
I can't use windows to remove the character manually. My servers are Unix so I need to remove the character at that point. I have tried the following but it didn't work.

Control characters shown with cat -vet in Unix:

/home/temp_files > cat -vet SO.txt
My file contains an apostrophe (M-^R). I am able to see this character if the file opens in Windows but not able to see it if the file opens in Unix. But I need to use that file once after removing that character.$
I can't use windows to remove the character manually. My servers are Unix so I need to remove the character at that point. I have tried the following but it didn't work.$

Replace with sed:

/home/temp_files > cat -vet SO.txt  | sed 's/M-^R//g'
My file contains an apostrophe (). I am able to see this character if the file opens in Windows but not able to see it if the file opens in Unix. But I need to use that file once after removing that character.$
I can't use windows to remove the character manually. My servers are Unix so I need to remove the character at that point. I have tried the following but it didn't work.$
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You can use the following to find-replace ' using sed (note that you need to escape special characters)

$ cat a.txt
This line don't have a '
This is test

$ sed s/\'//g a.txt
This line dont have a
This is test

$ sed s/\'/\"/g a.txt
This line don"t have a "
This is test

If you want to edit the file in-place, you can use the following syntax (note that the contents of a.txt will be modified after execution of the command)

$ sed -i s/\'/\"/g a.txt
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