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How do I use JavaScript to detect

<br>
<br>
<br>

to become one

<br>

?

I tried with:

jQuery('body').html().replace(/(\<br\>\r\n){3, }/g,"\n");

but this is not working for me.

share|improve this question
2  
I'm surprised no one suggested using a regex :( –  Lescai Ionel Jun 12 '13 at 12:29
6  
@LescaiIonel Really? Read the answers. But anyway we have the DOM so why bother with regex? (Some days we'll see Tony the pony.) Also, replacing the HTML will cause the browser to reparse the HTML which is not efficient. –  Alvin Wong Jun 12 '13 at 12:34
5  
If you don't want to have multiple <br>, why are they there in the first place? –  RoToRa Jun 12 '13 at 12:40
2  
How did this question and answer get so many views and votes in such a short timespan...? –  Rob W Jun 12 '13 at 16:02
3  
@mskfisher: What's more curious is how this question made it to Hot Questions in the first place. –  BoltClock Jun 13 '13 at 3:07
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7 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Simpler:

var newText = oldText.replace(/(<br\s*\/?>){3,}/gi, '<br>');

This will allow optional tag terminator (/>) and also spaces before tag end (e.g. <br /> or <br >).

share|improve this answer
    
But how could I ensure it will only work when it found more than 3 <br > just do the job? –  user610983 Jun 12 '13 at 9:31
    
It replaces any 2 or more to only 1. –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 12 '13 at 9:32
    
But changing the quantifier + to {3,} as in the other examples will make it work that way. Updated answer... –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 12 '13 at 9:34
2  
All answers that use \n or \r are the wrong approach... –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 12 '13 at 9:35
1  
Simply executing the .replce() will NOT change the original value. You must assign the return value of the replace method to the original variable. –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 12 '13 at 10:17
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CSS Solution

If you want to disable the effect of multiple <br> on the page, you can do it by CSS without using JavaScript:

br + br { display: none; }

However, this method is ideal when you are working with tags, something like this:

<div>Text</div><br /><br /><br />
<div>Text</div><br /><br /><br />
<div>Text</div><br /><br /><br />

In other cases, like this:

Hello World<br />   <br />
Hello World<br />   <br />
Hello World<br />   <br />

It will fail (as CSS passes text nodes). Instead, use a JavaScript solution.


JavaScript Solution

// It's better to wait for document ready instead of window.onload().
window.onload = function () {
    // Get all `br` tags, defined needed variables
    var br = document.getElementsByTagName('br'),
        l = br.length,
        i = 0,
        nextelem, elemname, include;

    // Loop through tags
    for (i; i < l - 1; i++) {
        // This flag indentify we should hide the next element or not
        include = false;

        // Getting next element
        nextelem = br[i].nextSibling;

        // Getting element name
        elemname = nextelem.nodeName.toLowerCase();

        // If element name is `br`, set the flag as true.
        if (elemname == 'br') {
            include = true;
        }

        // If element name is `#text`, we face text node
        else if (elemname == '#text') {
            // If text node is only white space, we must pass it.
            // This is because of something like this: `<br />   <br />`
            if (! nextelem.data.replace(/\s+/g, '').length) {
                nextelem = br[i+1];
                include = true;
            }
        }

        // If the element is flagged as true, hide it
        if (include) {
            nextelem.style.display = 'none';
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
23  
@Joseph The definition of "br + br" is a br element that is placed directly after another br element. It only matches one element, not two at the same time. The selector will match all consecutive br elements except for the first. –  MatsT Jun 12 '13 at 13:12
12  
This solution can remove some more <br> than expected too, if there are no tags in between: jsfiddle.net/ahMMv/13 –  zch Jun 12 '13 at 20:05
2  
What are these new-fangled jigga mahoo's? Things have changed since I was a beginner. –  0x499602D2 Jun 12 '13 at 20:42
2  
@0x499602D2 do you mean the + token in CSS? It's been standard for a while, as has > –  jackweirdy Jun 13 '13 at 0:24
3  
(Sorry about the last incorrect comment) Here's a remedy to @zch 's spotted problem: jsfiddle.net/ahMMv/17 –  Passerby Jun 13 '13 at 4:57
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What is the point of sending HTML, which is in a form that you don't want, to the client browser and making it run JavaScript code to clean it up? This looks like a bad design.

How about fixing all your static HTML, and HTML generation, so that these superfluous <br> elements do not occur in the first place?

If you use JavaScript to modify the document object, do so for dynamic effects that cannot be achieved in any other way.

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1  
Maybe the multiple <br> tags were already created by Javascript. –  Uooo Jun 13 '13 at 5:53
4  
@w4rumu Or maybe the HTML came from a different site. Javascript isn't always a package with a particular web site. There could be Javascript running in the browser as a browser extension, editing HTML for the user. –  Kaz Jun 13 '13 at 6:26
1  
While in general your advice is good (so +1), it doesn't directly answer the question. Sometimes you have to deal with html where you have absolutely no control over who generated it or why it was generated that way -- in which case direct solutions to questions like this become beneficial and things like "fix it to begin with" become impossible. (On the other hand, usually these kinds of transformations of html you don't have control over happen on the server side anyway, in which case they can be fixed on that side -- javascript is probably the wrong place to be doing this in any case). –  Ben Lee Jun 18 '13 at 21:45
1  
But, I can still see there being valid reasons for client-only manipulation of html outside of control -- it's just not typical. –  Ben Lee Jun 18 '13 at 21:50
    
Wow, no knowledge of the context and has no answer but still needs to say 'its bad design'. –  dcarapic Jun 19 '13 at 7:04
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Wouldn't something like this be the right approach:

$("br~br").remove()

EDIT: No, it's wrong, because its definition of "contiguous" is too loose, as per BoltClock.

share|improve this answer
1  
To elaborate, that is the jQuery "next siblings" selector: api.jquery.com/next-siblings-selector –  mskfisher Jun 12 '13 at 15:39
14  
This kills the second <br> in <br><hr><br><hr>, despite the <br> elements not being contiguous. Depending on the use case, this may not be desirable. –  BoltClock Jun 12 '13 at 17:03
2  
You're much too polite. Thanks. :) –  Steve Bennett Jun 13 '13 at 1:33
2  
@BoltClock The adjacent selector should be used instead, right? –  Licson Jun 13 '13 at 6:09
    
@Licson: Correct. –  BoltClock Jun 13 '13 at 6:22
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Try this

$('body').html($('body').html().replace(/(<br>)+/g,"<br>"));

It will replace n number of <br> into one.

Demo

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3  
That solution would break the moment there was something, like say a space or a line break, between the different <br> tags. –  Eivind Eidheim Elseth Jun 12 '13 at 12:51
2  
So, just add a \s* or something similar... –  Macke Jun 12 '13 at 15:45
1  
1  
The best regex for this would be: .replace(/(<br\s*/?>\s*)+/g, "<br>\n") it handles all sorts of breaks with all sorts of spacing. Also, the replace also breaks the line afterward. I'd suggest replacing with <br />\n, but his apparrent preference isn't self-closing. –  Suamere Jun 12 '13 at 18:43
2  
@Qantas94Heavy The problem is more that you lose information by doing that. E.g. any event handlers bound within body will be removed. This is not a good idea to my mind. –  lonesomeday Jun 14 '13 at 20:51
show 1 more comment

Try this:

jQuery('body').html(
      jQuery('body').html().replace(/(?:<br>\s+){3,}/ig,"\n"));
);

DEMO: jsfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
don't -1 her! what she suggested is fine only that she replaces all <br>s with an line break \n. change that to <br> and you'll be fine. –  yardarrat Jun 12 '13 at 18:23
    
It's a good effort, but using a regex instead of the DOM guarantees future problems and edge cases. –  mskfisher Jun 13 '13 at 17:10
add comment

I would go with this:

$('body').html($('body').html().replace(/<br\W?\\?>(\W?(<br\W?\\?>)+)+/g,"<br>"));

However, after reading the comments in another post here I do consider that you should try to avoid doing this in case you can correct it in the back end.

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