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Let's say I have a list of objects, objA. Now objA can create more objA, and they will be completely unrelated to one another - they do not care to know about other objA existence in the slightest. How could I get the objA created by another objA without storing objA inside of it's spawner? I don't want to use a singleton to represent the list of objA.

Example:

class Container
{  
     list<Monster*> listOfMonsters;

     void UpdateAllMonsters()
     {
          foreach(Monster monster in listOfMonsters)
          {
              monster.Update();
          }
     }         

};

class Monster
{
    void Update()
    { 
         new Monster();
    }
};

How could I get the Monster created in the Update() method and stick it in the Containers listOfMonsters? I only want one instance of the Container object floating around, and the monsters shouldn't be able to do anything with the container object.

One solution I have thought of is creating an intermediate object between the Container and the Monster, so that there would only be one instance of the Container object, and the monster could essentially only access one method of the Container object(which would be adding to the listOfMonsters).

IE;

class Container
{  
     list<Monster*> listOfMonsters;

     void UpdateAllMonsters()
     {
          foreach(Monster monster in listOfMonsters)
          {
              monster.Update();
          }
     }         

     void AddToList(Monster* monster)
     {
         listOfMonsters.add(monster);
     }


};


class ContainerLiason
{
     private __Container*;

     AddToContainer(Monster* monster)
     {
         __Container.AddToList(monster);
     }
};

class Monster
{

    private ContainerLiason* __liason;
    void Update()
    { 
         __liason.AddToContainer(new Monster());
    }
};

Are there any other ideas or design patterns? One other thing, would the above example be a type of design pattern and what would it be called if so? I just ask because I've used singletons before I knew what they were called or even what they were.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The factory pattern should do what you need. Let the container (aka the factory) not only hold the list of created objects but also take care of the object creation itself:

class Factory {  
  list<shared_ptr<Monster>> listOfMonsters;
public:
  void UpdateAllMonsters() {
    for(auto pMonster : listOfMonsters)  {
      monster->Update();
    }
  }         

  shared_ptr<Monster> createMonster() {
    auto newMonster = make_shared<Monster>();
    listOfMonsters.push_back(newMonster);
    return newMonster;
  }
};

class Monster {
  shared_ptr<Factory> theFactory;
public:
  void Update() { 
    auto newMonster = theFactory->createMonster();
    // ...
  }
};

Note also that you asked under the C++ tag - your code does not really look like it

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I know my code doesn't really look like C++ - even though I used the C++ tag - I was more trying to write psuedo code(I guess it ended up looking more closely like C# than anything though) GDI Enter key. Would you mind explaining a couple of things? I have never used shared_ptr(Or any kind of smart pointer). I don't fully comprehend why I would use a shared_ptr - could you explain please? –  Daniel Martin Jun 12 '13 at 10:06
    
Well, I think one SO comment is not enough to tell you about the usfulness of smart pointers, but there are extensive resources in the web that can introduce you to the topic. They are considered part of "modern C++", and not using them (where appropiate) is considered bad design more and more. auto is not redundant in my code, it's not the completely redundant storage specifier from C++98 but the automatic type deduction keyword from C++11. You'll want to look that up, too. –  Arne Mertz Jun 12 '13 at 10:13
    
+1 - This is a clean solution. –  Dennis Jun 12 '13 at 10:18
    
Oh wow, I'll have to start using smart pointers now. I was unaware of their existence outside of the boost library. One thing, though: is it safe to assume that the raw pointer in a unique_ptr will be deleted when the unique_ptr leaves scope much like the raw pointer is deleted when all shared_ptrs leave scope? From what I've read it looks like it does, but I could just call .release() on the unique_ptr if I really wanted to free memory up for whatever reason and I have no use for the object anymore. –  Daniel Martin Jun 12 '13 at 14:29
    
en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/unique_ptr should answer those questions. release will not destroy the managed object. Use reset instead or just assign a nullptr. If you were unaware of smart pointers outside boost you definetely should read an article or better a book about C++11. Lots of useful new stuff! –  Arne Mertz Jun 12 '13 at 14:34

Your solution seems to be the one, you just need to be sure that all monster have the same pointer on ContainerLiaison, you can use a reference if you want.

Another solution is to have a reference on the Containter in each monster, but I think your ContainerLiason is better.

A last solution is static element and function, but I don't like it.

I suggest that you keep your solution

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Okay, so you definitely do not need to use a singleton here. The simplest option is simply to Update a reference to a MonsterContainer as a parameter.

class Container
{  
     using MonsterList = list<Monster*>; // you should use a shared container or shared_ptrs here instead I think.
     MonsterList listOfMonsters;

     void UpdateAllMonsters()
     {
          foreach(Monster monster in listOfMonsters)
          {
              monster.Update(listOfMonsters);
          }
     }         

};

class Monster
{
    // You should change the name of your function here. Update does not imply
    // creation to me. I would call it "CreateMonsterInList"
    void Update(MonsterList& monsterContainer)
    { 
         monsterContainer.add( new Monster() );
    }
}
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