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I tried to use ng-model on input tag with type file:

<input type="file" ng-model="vm.uploadme" />

But after selecting a file, in controller, $scope.vm.uploadme is still undefined.

How do I get the selected file in my controller?

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1  
See stackoverflow.com/a/17923521/135114, especially the cited example online at jsfiddle.net/danielzen/utp7j –  Daryn Sep 11 '13 at 22:28
    
I believe you always need to specify the name property on the html element when using ngModel. –  Sam Jan 3 '14 at 1:05

9 Answers 9

up vote 118 down vote accepted

I created a workaround with directive:

.directive("fileread", [function () {
    return {
        scope: {
            fileread: "="
        },
        link: function (scope, element, attributes) {
            element.bind("change", function (changeEvent) {
                var reader = new FileReader();
                reader.onload = function (loadEvent) {
                    scope.$apply(function () {
                        scope.fileread = loadEvent.target.result;
                    });
                }
                reader.readAsDataURL(changeEvent.target.files[0]);
            });
        }
    }
}]);

And the input tag becomes:

<input type="file" fileread="vm.uploadme" />

Or if just the file definition is needed:

.directive("fileread", [function () {
    return {
        scope: {
            fileread: "="
        },
        link: function (scope, element, attributes) {
            element.bind("change", function (changeEvent) {
                scope.$apply(function () {
                    scope.fileread = changeEvent.target.files[0];
                    // or all selected files:
                    // scope.fileread = changeEvent.target.files;
                });
            });
        }
    }
}]);
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How do I access the image data from the controller? –  Per Quested Aronsson Sep 18 '13 at 19:15
    
@PerQuestedAronsson through $scope.uploadme (like in the question). –  Endy Tjahjono Sep 19 '13 at 3:58
1  
I use uploadme as src in an img tag, so I can see it is getting set by the directive. However, if I try to grab it from the controller using $scope.uploadme, it is "undefined". I can set uploadme from the controller, though. For example, $scope.uploadme="*" makes the image disappear. –  Per Quested Aronsson Sep 19 '13 at 18:15
    
@PerQuestedAronsson maybe create a new question with code sample included? –  Endy Tjahjono Sep 20 '13 at 4:22
2  
The problem is that the directive creates a childScope, and sets uploadme in that scope. The original (parent) scope also has an uploadme, which is unaffected by the childScope. I can update uploadme in the HTML from either scope. Is there a way to avoid creating a childScope at all? –  Per Quested Aronsson Sep 20 '13 at 6:54

I use this directive:

angular.module('appFilereader', []).directive('appFilereader', function($q) {
    var slice = Array.prototype.slice;

    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        require: '?ngModel',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
                if (!ngModel) return;

                ngModel.$render = function() {};

                element.bind('change', function(e) {
                    var element = e.target;

                    $q.all(slice.call(element.files, 0).map(readFile))
                        .then(function(values) {
                            if (element.multiple) ngModel.$setViewValue(values);
                            else ngModel.$setViewValue(values.length ? values[0] : null);
                        });

                    function readFile(file) {
                        var deferred = $q.defer();

                        var reader = new FileReader();
                        reader.onload = function(e) {
                            deferred.resolve(e.target.result);
                        };
                        reader.onerror = function(e) {
                            deferred.reject(e);
                        };
                        reader.readAsDataURL(file);

                        return deferred.promise;
                    }

                }); //change

            } //link
    }; //return
});

and invoke it like this:

<input type="file" ng-model="editItem._attachments_uri.image" accept="image/*" app-filereader />

The property (editItem.editItem._attachments_uri.image) will be populated with the contents of the file you select as a data-uri (!).

Please do note that this script will not upload anything. It will only populate your model with the contents of your file encoded ad a data-uri (base64).

Check out a working demo here: http://plnkr.co/CMiHKv2BEidM9SShm9Vv

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1  
Look promising, can you please explain the logic behind the code, and comment about browser compatibility(IE and non - fileAPI browser mostly)? –  Oleg Tikhonov Nov 6 '13 at 18:05
    
Also, to the best of my understanding, if I will set the content-type header of the AJAX request to undefined, and will try to send such a field to the server, angular will upload it, assuming that the browser supports fileAPI, am I correct? –  Oleg Tikhonov Nov 6 '13 at 18:06
    
@OlegTikhonov you are not correct! This script will not send anything. It will read the file you selected as a Base64 string and update your model with that string. –  Elmer Nov 15 '13 at 7:33
    
Please could you update the link to the plnkr? –  Paul Nov 15 '13 at 11:07
    
@Elmer Yes, I understand, what I mean is that by sending a form that contains a file field (a relative path to the file in the user's machine in a FileAPI object), you can make the angular upload the file by an XHR request by setting the content type header to undefined –  Oleg Tikhonov Nov 15 '13 at 20:16

This is an addendum to @endy-tjahjono's solution.

I ended up not being able to get the value of uploadme from the scope. Even though uploadme in the HTML was visibly updated by the directive, I could still not access its value by $scope.uploadme. I was able to set its value from the scope, though. Mysterious, right..?

As it turned out, a child scope was created by the directive, and the child scope had its own uploadme.

The solution was to use an object rather than a primitive to hold the value of uploadme.

In the controller I have:

$scope.uploadme = {};
$scope.uploadme.src = "";

and in the HTML:

 <input type="file" fileread="uploadme.src"/>
 <input type="text" ng-model="uploadme.src"/>

There are no changes to the directive.

Now, it all works like expected. I can grab the value of uploadme.src from my controller using $scope.uploadme.

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2  
Maybe this is similar to your issue? egghead.io/lessons/angularjs-the-dot –  Endy Tjahjono Sep 21 '13 at 8:25
    
Yup, that's exactly it. –  Per Quested Aronsson Sep 21 '13 at 8:33
    
Thanks to @PerQuestedAronsson for this explanation. It helped me :) –  Somaiah Kumbera Apr 30 '14 at 21:12
    
I confirm the same experience; very nice debug and explanation. I'm not sure why the directive is creating its own scope. –  Adam Casey Aug 12 '14 at 2:32

This is a slightly modified version that lets you specify the name of the attribute in the scope, just as you would do with ng-model, usage:

    <myUpload key="file"></myUpload>

Directive:

.directive('myUpload', function() {
    return {
        link: function postLink(scope, element, attrs) {
            element.find("input").bind("change", function(changeEvent) {                        
                var reader = new FileReader();
                reader.onload = function(loadEvent) {
                    scope.$apply(function() {
                        scope[attrs.key] = loadEvent.target.result;                                
                    });
                }
                if (typeof(changeEvent.target.files[0]) === 'object') {
                    reader.readAsDataURL(changeEvent.target.files[0]);
                };
            });

        },
        controller: 'FileUploadCtrl',
        template:
                '<span class="btn btn-success fileinput-button">' +
                '<i class="glyphicon glyphicon-plus"></i>' +
                '<span>Replace Image</span>' +
                '<input type="file" accept="image/*" name="files[]" multiple="">' +
                '</span>',
        restrict: 'E'

    };
});
share|improve this answer

I had to do same on multiple input, so i updated @Endy Tjahjono method. It returns an array containing all readed files.

  .directive("fileread", function () {
    return {
      scope: {
        fileread: "="
      },
      link: function (scope, element, attributes) {
        element.bind("change", function (changeEvent) {
          var readers = [] ,
              files = changeEvent.target.files ,
              datas = [] ;
          for ( var i = 0 ; i < files.length ; i++ ) {
            readers[ i ] = new FileReader();
            readers[ i ].onload = function (loadEvent) {
              datas.push( loadEvent.target.result );
              if ( datas.length === files.length ){
                scope.$apply(function () {
                  scope.fileread = datas;
                });
              }
            }
            readers[ i ].readAsDataURL( files[i] );
          }
        });

      }
    }
  });
share|improve this answer

For multiple files input using lodash or underscore:

.directive("fileread", [function () {
    return {
        scope: {
            fileread: "="
        },
        link: function (scope, element, attributes) {
            element.bind("change", function (changeEvent) {
                return _.map(changeEvent.target.files, function(file){
                  scope.fileread = [];
                  var reader = new FileReader();
                  reader.onload = function (loadEvent) {
                      scope.$apply(function () {
                          scope.fileread.push(loadEvent.target.result);
                      });
                  }
                  reader.readAsDataURL(file);
                });
            });
        }
    }
}]);
share|improve this answer

function filesModelDirective(){
  return {
    controller: function($parse, $element, $attrs, $scope){
      var exp = $parse($attrs.filesModel);
      $element.on('change', function(){
        exp.assign($scope, this.files[0]);
        $scope.$apply();
      });
    }
  };
}
app.directive('filesModel', filesModelDirective);

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Install angular-file-model. Its amazing.

Here is the link https://github.com/ghostbar/angular-file-model

Good luck.

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1  
Perhaps you could explain why it is amazing with relation to the question. –  Eric Hauenstein Jun 11 at 12:19

There is no need from extra code, writing own scripts and s.o.:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html ng-app="theApp">
<head lang="en">
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>    
    Image immediately: <input type="text" data-ng-model="image"><img ng-src="{{image}}"/>    
    <script src="angular.min.js"></script>
    <script>
        var demoApp = angular.module('theApp', []);    
    </script>
</body>
</html>

If you write valid image url, the image would appear immediately.

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3  
This answer is unrelated to the original question. –  juanluisrp Dec 22 '14 at 13:35

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