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I'm in a dilemma. The (reduced) task is to redesign the following data holder class

class Stuff
{
  public String SomeInfo { get; set; }
}

to accommodate the demand that null mustn't be returned. I can think of two ways to achieve that and after deep consideration of 15 minutes, I simply can't decide which one is to be preferred.

Approach by constructor.

class Stuff
{
  public String SomeInfo { get; set; }
  public Stuff() { SomeInfo = String.Empty; }
}

Approach by property.

class Stuff
{
  private String _SomeInfo;
  public String SomeInfo 
  { 
    get { return _SomeInfo ?? String.Empty; }
    set { _SomeInfo = value; }
  }
}

Note that the creation of the Stuff instances might be done using the constructor as well as initialization, if that's of any significance. As far as I'm informed, there won't be any other restrictions (but you know how the customers' specifications not always reflect the reality).

share|improve this question
9  
Well - your first option doesn't meet your requirements - as I can still set the property to null. #2 is your only real choice. – Dave Bish Jun 12 '13 at 11:44
1  
If by initialization you mean some form of deserialization be aware that some implementations wont execute constructor code. – Rafal Jun 12 '13 at 11:47
1  
Another minor flavour on #2 might be to validate input when setting the value instead of when retrieving. If you find you're retrieving null/Empty values very often, instead doing the check once/rarely when setting might be preferred. EDIT: Note that this assumes you're vigilant enough not to set the backing field to null. – Chris Sinclair Jun 12 '13 at 11:47
    
Good points. Thanks! – Konrad Viltersten Jun 12 '13 at 13:26
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can only ensure that null is never returned when you use the property:

class Stuff
{
  private String _SomeInfo;
  public String SomeInfo 
  { 
    get { return _SomeInfo ?? String.Empty; }
    set { _SomeInfo = value; }
  }
}

The same approach is used by text-controls(e.g. in ASP.NET) where the Text property never returns null but String.Empty.

For example(ILSpy):

// System.Web.UI.WebControls.TextBox
public virtual string Text
{
    get
    {
        string text = (string)this.ViewState["Text"];
        if (text != null)
        {
            return text;
        }
        return string.Empty;
    }
    set
    {
        this.ViewState["Text"] = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can also implement the logic in the setter rather than in the getter, that way your back field always has a valid value

class Stuff
{
  private String _SomeInfo = string.Empty;
  public String SomeInfo 
  { 
    get { return _SomeInfo; }
    set 
    { 
      if (value != null)
      {
        _SomeInfo = value; 
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You might want to update the if check to set String.Empty instead of doing nothing. For example: myStuff.SomeInfo = "Hello!"; myStuff.SomeInfo = null; Console.WriteLine(myStuff.SomeInfo); //prints Hello! EDIT: Probably as simple as _someInfo = value ?? String.Empty; – Chris Sinclair Jun 12 '13 at 11:53
    
@ChrisSinclair I think this is really up to the OP. One could also decide to throw an exception in the case of an error... – vc 74 Jun 12 '13 at 11:56
    
+1 I agree that there are a few options. I only suggested it because assigning String.Empty would be consistent with the behaviour OP is demonstrating now. – Chris Sinclair Jun 12 '13 at 13:01
    
@vc74 I think it's null just in the beginning, before any assignment, isn't it. Of course, I understand your point and I find it valid. However, I believe that it would still require a protector on both the setter and the getter. And since getter by itself suffice, the setter based protector is rendered redundant, isn't it? Haven't tried that in the code - I'm just figuring here. – Konrad Viltersten Jun 12 '13 at 13:24
    
@KonradViltersten it won't be null, it's initialized to empty – vc 74 Jun 12 '13 at 14:29

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