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I have a collection of CIDR ranges with the following schema:

{ bottom: Number
top: Number
cidrText: String
live: Boolean
hits: Number }

What I am trying to do is to find if an ip is within the bottom + top ranges (and then perform a $inc update on the hits on that record.

At the moment my index is:

db.tbl.ensureIndex( { bottom: 1, top: 1, live: 1 } );

But when I run my query - only part of the query uses the index and then this has a large impact on my servers performance:

My query is:

db.tbl.find({ live: true, top: { $gte: 3266341261 }, bottom: { $lte: 3266341261 } })

The explain output is:

{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor top_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 0,
    "nscannedObjects" : 0,
    "nscanned" : 0,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 0,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 7,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 0,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "top" : [
            [
                3266341261,
                1.7976931348623157e+308
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "local:27017"
}

Is there a way I can get both $gte and $lte to use the same index - or should I run 2 queries and find a row that matches in both queries?

Edit I have dropped all existing indices and re-added the compound index and now I get correct bounds, but nscanned is still high.

{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor bottom_1_top_1_live_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 0,
    "nscannedObjects" : 0,
    "nscanned" : 4748,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 4746,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 9494,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 15,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "bottom" : [
            [
                -1.7976931348623157e+308,
                3633904421
            ]
        ],
        "top" : [
            [
                3633904421,
                1.7976931348623157e+308
            ]
        ],
        "live" : [
            [
                true,
                true
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "local27017"
}

Also I get this in my log:

warning: ClientCursor::yield can't unlock b/c of recursive lock ns: col.tbl top: { opid: 25701683, active: true, secs_running: 0, op: "query", ns: "tbl", query: { findandmodify: "tbl", query: { live: true, top: { $gte: 1584813140 }, bottom: { $lte: 1584813140 } }, sort: {}, new: 1, remove: 0, upsert: 0, update: { $inc: { hits: 1 } } }, client: "127.0.0.1:39407", desc: "conn581", threadId: "0x497ec940", connectionId: 581, locks: { ^: "w", ^tbl: "W" }, waitingForLock: false, numYields: 0, lockStats: { timeLockedMicros: {}, timeAcquiringMicros: { r: 0, w: 3 } } }

Edit 2

Too clear up the "order of find parameters" is does look like the order of the search term does need to match the index order (atleast in 2.4.4). Running these 2 queries - one uses the full index the other does not.

> db.tbl.find({top: {$lte: 1454442030}, bottom: {$gte: 1454442030}}).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor top_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 2,
    "nscannedObjects" : 2271,
    "nscanned" : 2271,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 6816,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 11396,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 24,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "top" : [
            [
                -1.7976931348623157e+308,
                1454442030
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "local:27017"
}

and

> db.tbl.find({bottom: {$lte: 1454442030}, top: {$gte: 1454442030}}).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor bottom_1_top_1_live_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 2,
    "nscannedObjects" : 2,
    "nscanned" : 2080,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 6240,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 10400,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 23,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "bottom" : [
            [
                -1.7976931348623157e+308,
                1454442030
            ]
        ],
        "top" : [
            [
                1454442030,
                1.7976931348623157e+308
            ]
        ],
        "live" : [
            [
                {
                    "$minElement" : 1
                },
                {
                    "$maxElement" : 1
                }
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "local:27017"
}

Thanks

Mark

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by WiredPrairie, Asya Kamsky, Louis, flx, Paul Mougel Mar 4 at 19:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Seems like this is the same question and issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/8061022/… –  WiredPrairie Jun 12 '13 at 12:24
    
The explain output is odd -- nothing was scanned? –  WiredPrairie Jun 12 '13 at 12:26
    
Could you reorder your find query to match the order of the compound index? –  WiredPrairie Jun 12 '13 at 12:34
    
@WiredPrairie the order in find is completely irrelevant - only order of the index matters. –  Asya Kamsky Jun 12 '13 at 15:37
    
@AsyaKamsky - The docs are very careful to always order it in a matching sequence (I wish the docs were more clear and absolute about this). –  WiredPrairie Jun 12 '13 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

The reason the number of scanned index entries is high is because of the order of selectivity of keys in your compound index. The order of the entries in the index matters a lot both for which queries the index can be used for, but also to the number of index entries the query has to scan.

If it is the case that the percentage of entries in your collection which have live=true is very low you would be better off constructing your compound index with "live" as the first key - since any query which has live=true will be highly selective.

Without knowing your data distribution and your query patterns it's hard to know for sure what is the right approach but as a general rule, if you have a choice about the order of fields you want to put most selective keys first and least selective ones last.

share|improve this answer

The warning has nothing to do with this find() query.

Also, why don't you think that nscanned should not be high ?

Basically { bottom: { $lte: 3266341261 } } will have to check all index records matching this, and then has to apply the { top: { $gte: 3266341261 } } filter. Check the index boundaries in explaing() which I guess is applied as expected and correctly.

Can you run following. It should be close to { "nscanned" : 4748 }

db.tbl.find({ bottom: { $lte: 3266341261 } }).explain()
share|improve this answer
    
the result of this is: "nscanned" : 4683, running with no find value 'find()' results in: "nscanned" : 5317 –  Mark Willis Jun 13 '13 at 7:56
    
If the value is 4683, then nscanned for your original question has to be high. nscanned is the total index entries that has to be scanned. I am guessing you are not confusing with nscannedObjects –  Abhishek Kumar Jun 13 '13 at 8:17

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