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Is there any conceivable difference between

$x->{a}{b}

and

$x->{a}->{b}

for any allowed value of $x->{a}, in any of the perl versions >= 5.6?

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2  
perldoc perlref's Using References section point #3 saith, "One more thing here. The arrow is optional between brackets subscripts" –  doubleDown Jun 12 '13 at 13:32
    
I was thinking that perhaps a combination of perl versions and/or possible values for {a} (e.g. blessed/unblessed/autovivified) may mean a difference, and that I wouldn't be able to know that just from my local 5.10 perldoc output, thus the question :) –  Irfy Jun 12 '13 at 13:35
    
if you are targeting 5.6 but developing on 5.10, you will have some problems. at the very least, try to check your code using Perl::MinimumVersion –  ysth Jun 12 '13 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

No. This is just a syntactic shortcut without any semantic difference.

Proof: the opcodes that are produced upon compilation

$ perl -MO=Concise -e'$x->{a}{b}'
b  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
a     <2> helem vK/2 ->b
8        <1> rv2hv[t3] sKR/1 ->9
7           <2> helem sKM/DREFHV,2 ->8
5              <1> rv2hv[t2] sKR/1 ->6
4                 <1> rv2sv sKM/DREFHV,1 ->5
3                    <#> gv[*x] s ->4
6              <$> const[PV "a"] s/BARE ->7
9        <$> const[PV "b"] s/BARE ->a
-e syntax OK

$ perl -MO=Concise -e'$x->{a}->{b}'
b  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
a     <2> helem vK/2 ->b
8        <1> rv2hv[t3] sKR/1 ->9
7           <2> helem sKM/DREFHV,2 ->8
5              <1> rv2hv[t2] sKR/1 ->6
4                 <1> rv2sv sKM/DREFHV,1 ->5
3                    <#> gv[*x] s ->4
6              <$> const[PV "a"] s/BARE ->7
9        <$> const[PV "b"] s/BARE ->a
-e syntax OK

See also perlref, section Using References, rule 3.

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There are some places where -> didn't become optional until later than 5.6. I believe these are some:

$x->('a'){'b'} # coderef called, returning a reference
({a=>42})[0]{'a'} # reference from a list slice
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1  
I didn't think $x->('a'){'b'} was valid, and I can't make it work. (Perl 5 v 16) –  Borodin Jun 12 '13 at 13:37
    
I'm not sure where the arrows would have to be in the second example -- can you elaborate? –  Irfy Jun 12 '13 at 13:38
    
@Borodin perl -E'say sub{+{a=>1,b=>$_[0]}}->("a"){"b"}' works fine for me, on v5.16.3 –  amon Jun 12 '13 at 13:40
1  
Ah. But say sub{ +{ a => 1, b => $_[0] } }->('a'){b} throws a Bareword "b" not allowed error. This looks like a bug. –  Borodin Jun 12 '13 at 13:46

The constructs are identical. Perl allows the -> between any pair of closing and opening brackets to be omitted.

This works, and prints OKOK.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = {
  a => {
    b => [
      sub { { c => 'OK' } }
    ]
  }
};

print $data->{a}->{b}->[0]->()->{c};

print $data->{a}{b}[0](){'c'};
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