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I am learing Ruby, and I just found interesting behaviour when using the Object#freeze method with variables.

After I freeze a variable (either Fixnum or Array), I am still able to modify it! It is strange, since as far as I am concerned this should not happen and TypeError should be raised.

Here's my code:

test = 666
var = 90
#ok
var += 5

puts "var.frozen? #{var.frozen?}"    
var.freeze    
puts "var.frozen? #{var.frozen?}"

var = test
puts "var = #{var}"

The same is for array:

test = [666]
var = [90]
#ok
var += [5]

puts "var.frozen? #{var.frozen?}"    
var.freeze    
puts "var.frozen? #{var.frozen?}"

var = test
puts "var = #{var}"

But when I try to push something into the array after freezing, it raises an arror, as expected:

test = [666]
var = [90]
#ok
var += [5]

puts "var.frozen? #{var.frozen?}"    
var.freeze    
puts "var.frozen? #{var.frozen?}"

var << test
puts "var = #{var}"

Can somebody explain to me this issue? It seems strange.

Edit I am using Windows XP + Ruby 1.9.3-p429

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1  
curious - why does test = 666 :P –  sircapsalot Jun 12 '13 at 13:47
    
That isn't what freezing does; it's working exactly as intended. You can't freeze immutable values like literal numbers, and you definitely can't "freeze" variables so they can't be set to new values. You only freeze objects. –  meagar Jun 12 '13 at 13:54
1  
@meagar: You can freeze immutables. It is just pointless because they cannot be changed anyway. But 5.freeze does work ... in the sense that 5.frozen?returns true. –  undur_gongor Jun 12 '13 at 13:59
    
@undur_gongor True, it's important that immutable values support the freeze/frozen? interface. –  meagar Jun 12 '13 at 14:34
1  
@sircapsalot: well, you do evil things with thise freeze method :) –  Filip Zymek Jun 12 '13 at 15:10
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You freeze objects, not variables, i.e. you can't update a frozen object but you can assign a new object to the same variable. Consider this:

a = [1,2,3]
a.freeze
a << 4
# RuntimeError: can't modify frozen Array

# `b` and `a` references the same frozen object
b = a
b << 4    
# RuntimeError: can't modify frozen Array

# You can replace the object referenced by `a` with an unfrozen one
a = [4, 5, 6]
a << 7
# => [4, 5, 6, 7]

As an aside: it is quite useless to freeze Fixnums, since they are immutable objects.

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Well, is me being sloppy by referring to 'freezing variables', what I had in mind was of course freezing objects (variable is just a label in code so it makes no nense to 'freeze' it :)) Ok, i now understand how does this freezing work, but still, I am still a little bit confused, why assigning new object does not raise any. Is this somehow connected to 'aliasing', like eg: #we have 1 object in memory and 1 aliases to it obj1 = Object.new obj1.freeze obj1 = Object.new #obj1 now points to another object, but memory for first object is still "frozen" ? Am I getting it right? –  Filip Zymek Jun 12 '13 at 15:11
    
@FilipZymek You got it. :) –  toro2k Jun 12 '13 at 15:12
    
Ok, this make perfect sense now, thanks! –  Filip Zymek Jun 12 '13 at 15:14
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In Ruby, variables are references to objects. You freeze the object, not the variable.

Please note also that

a = [1, 2]
a.freeze
a += [3]

is not an error because + for arrays creates a new object.

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As mentioned in the other two answers, you freeze objects rather than variables.

I'd like to add a note on child objects, which aren't frozen when the parent is frozen. This can bite you hard if you don't pay attention to what you're doing, when exposing an object's internal structures:

class A
  attr_accessor :var
end

a = A.new
a.var = []
a.freeze
a.var = []   # this fails as expected
a.var << :a  # this works, raises no errors, and no warnings

You can read about the rational here:

https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/6037

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this is usefull hint thanks! –  Filip Zymek Jun 12 '13 at 15:09
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