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Ive been searching online, but couldn't find any helpful info to help differentiate between the above relations, and they both look the same to me. Im not sure if it is referred to by another term, but the 'onlyOne' end of a relationship is usually marked by a curved arrow in er diagrams.

Wold really appreciate it is someone had a small example to help differentiate between the two.

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but what about 'many to OnlyOne' relationships, how are they different from 'many to one', couldnt find any info on this anywhere –  Quinnette Ribeiro'college Jun 12 '13 at 14:02

2 Answers 2

one to many example would be below: Customers table has the below fields customerId, customerName

Orders table has the below fields orderId, customerId, amount

The relationship between Customers and Orders table is 1 to many i.e. 1 customer can place many orders.

Many to Many example would be below: Questions table (like in stackoverflow) with fields questionId, question

Tags table with fields tagId, tagType(Database, C++ etc)

This is an example of many to many relationship i.e. a question can have many tags and a tag can belong to many questions. You need a seperate table to maintain this mapping.

i.e. TagQuestionMapping tagId, questionId

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but what about 'many to OnlyOne' relationships, how are they different from 'many to one', couldnt find any info on this anywhere –  Quinnette Ribeiro'college Jun 12 '13 at 14:01
    
many to OnlyOne is same as many to one. –  Prathik Puthran Jun 13 '13 at 6:01

This is about the minimum cardinality, also called participation. The participation indicates whether all the entity occurrences, for a given entity set, have to participate in the relationship or not. In other words, is the participation mandatory or optional?

In this case the rounded/curved arrow indicates mandatory participation, so each entity occurrence has to take part in the relationship.

Example: entities Employee and Department, linked by a relationship WorksFor which is a one-to-many relationship (an Employee works for one Department, and a Department can have multiple Employees working in there). Assuming each Employee has to be associated with at least one Department, so the participation is mandatory, you can define its cardinality as "one and only one" (or "exactly one").

Note: there are many ER notations out there (Chen's, UML, many more), so the rounded/curved arrow is not the only way to express a mandatory participation. The important aspect is to be consistent with the notation. See for example http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entity%E2%80%93relationship_model#Diagramming_conventions

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