Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have bash and awk script that I use to extract data from the text file.
However it is too slow with large datasets and doesn't work perfectly. I believe that it is possible to write all my bash loop in one awk command and I ask somebody to help me with this.

cat dummy_list 
    AAA
    AAAA
    AAAAA

cat dummy_table
    13   19   AAA   69   96   "ID-999"   34
    23   42   AAA   12   19   "ID-999"   64
    53   79   AAA   43   58   "ID-482"   36
    13   43   AAA   12   15   "ID-492"   75
    23   90   AAA   45   87   "ID-492"   34
    12   41   AAAA   76   79   "ID-923"   23
    19   58   AAAA   15   87   "ID-923"   75
    10   40   AAAA   18   82   "ID-482"   23
    11   18   AAAA   18   82   "ID-482"   52
    15   19   AAAA   18   82   "ID-482"   62
    59   69   AAAA   10   18   "ID-482"   83
    78   89   AAAA   32   41   "ID-983"   24
    23   53   AAAAA  78   99   "ID-916"   82

What I want from this table:

  1. For every dummy_list item (AAA or AAAA or AAAAA) extract how many different times ID range was mentioned ( by this I mean unique columns 4+5+6 (like 69 96 "ID-999")). There are duplicate ID's (like 18 82 "ID-482") and I have to discard them.
    My script looks like this:

    while read a; do  
        awk -v VAR="$a" '($3==VAR) {print $4"\t"$5"\t"$6}' dummy_table |   
        sort -u |   
        cut -f 3 |  
        sort |   
        uniq -c |   
        awk '{print $1}' |   
        tr '\n' ' ' |   
       awk -v VAR="$a" '{print VAR"\t"$0}'   
    done < dummy_list
    
    AAA     1 2 2 
    AAAA    2 2 1 
    AAAAA   1 
    

    It's the same as AAA "ID-482" mentioned once; "ID-492" mentioned twice; "ID-999" mentioned twice.

    This is the output I want.

  2. For every dummy_list item get average number of how many times it gets mentioned with the same ID. For example AAA occurs twice with "ID-999", one time with "ID-482" and two times with "ID-492" - so it's (2+1+2)/3=1.66

    My script looks like this:

    while read a ; do  
        ID_TIMES=$(awk -v VAR="$a" '($3==VAR) {print $6}' dummy_table | 
           sort -u | 
            wc -l) && 
        awk -v  VAR="$a" '($3==VAR) {print $6}' dummy_table | 
        sort | 
        uniq -c | 
        awk -v VAR="$ID_TIMES" '{sum+=$1} END {print sum/VAR}' 
    done < dummy_list
    
    AAA   1.666  
    AAAA  2.333
    AAAAA 1
    
  3. For every dummy_list item extract ID range and calculate proportion between columns. For example:
    for AAA's ID-999:
    RANGE1=sum $5-$4(96-69) + $5-$4(19-12)
    RANGE2=sum $7(34+64)
    then RANGE2*100/RANGE1=288

    For the output like this:

    AAA 288 240 242 
    ....
    AAAAA 390
    

    I wasn't able to write such script by myself as I got stuck with two variables $RANGE1 and $RANGE2.
    If it it possible it would be great to discard duplicate ranges like 18 82 "ID-482" in this step as well.

I believe that all these there operations can be calculated with only one awk command and I feel desperate about my scripts. I really hope that someone will help me in this operation.

share|improve this question
    
Have you considered using a relational database? – Jack Maney Jun 12 '13 at 18:55
    
This is why I need all this data extraction. – Pgibas Jun 12 '13 at 19:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can try this.

file a.awk:

BEGIN {

    # read list of items

    while ( ( getline < "dummy_list" ) > 0 )
    {
        items[$1] = 0    
    }
}

{
    # calculate ammountof uniqur ids

    key = $3 SUBSEP $6

    if ( ! ( key in ids ) && ( $3 in items ) )
    {
        unique_ids[$3] += 1 
    }


    # calculate ammount of duplication

    ids [$3,$6] += 1 


    # calculate range parameters 

    range1 [$3,$6] += $5 - $4
    range2 [$3,$6] += $7 
}

END {

    for ( item in items )
    {
        print "--- item = " item " ---\n"

        for ( key in ids )
        {
            split ( key, s, SUBSEP );

            if ( s[1] != item ) continue;    

            range = range2[key] * 100 / range1[key] 

            average[item] += float ( ids[key] ) / unique_ids[item];

            print "id = " s[2] "\tammount of dup = " ids[key] "  range = " int ( range )
        }    

        print "\naverage = " average[item] "\n"
    }
}

run:

awk -f a.awk dummy_table

output:

--- item = AAAA ---

id = "ID-983"   ammount of dup = 1  range = 266
id = "ID-923"   ammount of dup = 2  range = 130
id = "ID-482"   ammount of dup = 4  range = 110

average = 2.33333

--- item = AAAAA ---

id = "ID-916"   ammount of dup = 1  range = 390

average = 1

--- item = AAA ---

id = "ID-999"   ammount of dup = 2  range = 288
id = "ID-482"   ammount of dup = 1  range = 240
id = "ID-492"   ammount of dup = 2  range = 242

average = 1.66667

There is one moment - I can't understand how you got 225 for "ID-482" and item AAA in question #3.

RANGE2 * 100 / RANGE1 = 36 * 100 / ( 58 - 43 ) = 240.

Are you sure, that your example on question #3 is correct?

share|improve this answer
    
My mistake - had to calculate percents manually, I edited my question. – Pgibas Jun 12 '13 at 18:13

Only a partial answer but here is a one-liner solution for your first problem:

  awk -F'   ' '{group[$3]++;ind[$6]++};{count[$3][$6]+=1}; END{for (i in group){for (j in ind) if(count[i][j] > 0) print i, j, count[i][j]}}' dummy_variable.txt 

Output:

AAA "ID-482" 1  
AAA "ID-999" 2  
AAA "ID-492" 2    
AAAA "ID-923" 2  
AAAA "ID-482" 4  
AAAA "ID-983" 1  
AAAAA "ID-916" 1

It is then fairly trivil to use this output to calculate the answer to your second question.

share|improve this answer
    
while read a ; do NUMBER=$(grep -w $a OUTPUT | awk '{print $2}' | sort -u | wc -l) && awk -v ID="$a" -v NUMBER="$NUMBER" '($1==ID) {sum+=$3} END {print sum/NUMBER}' OUTPUT ; done < dummy_list I have problem writing everything in one awk command and joining this with previous step. – Pgibas Jun 12 '13 at 19:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.