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I've put together this script to help me perform a search across specific files. It does something similar to grep, but I needed something a little more specific than what grep offers, so I'm trying my hand at Python.

I've got one class which has three methods. The second method listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile (on line 30) fails. It's a small script, but since tabs matter in Python, I've put it into a a gist, here. Can anyone tell my why my seemingly valid Python is invalid?

import os
import keyword
import sys


class Toodles:

    def walkAndList(directory):
        for dirname, dirnames, filenames in os.walk(directory):

            # print path to all filenames.
            for filename in filenames:
                workingFilename = os.path.join(dirname, filename)
                if(isSourceFile(filename)):
                    listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(filename)

            # Advanced usage:
            # editing the 'dirnames' list will stop os.walk() from recursing into there.
            if '.git' in dirnames:
                # don't go into any .git directories.
                dirnames.remove('.git')

            for dirs in dirnames:
                self.walkAndList(os.path.join(dirname, dirs)


    #   Find occurences of "todo" and "fixme" in a file
    #   If we find such an occurence, print the filename, 
    #   the line number, and the line itself.
    def listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(aFileName):
        input = open(aFileName)
        currentLine = 1
        for (line in input):
            line = line.lower()
            currentLine = currentLine + 1
            needle = "todo"
            if (needle in line):
                sys.stdout.write(aFileName + " (" + str(currentLine) + ")" + line)

    #Todo: add a comment
    def isSourceFile(self, name):
        fileName, fileExtension = os.path.splitext(name)
        if (".m" in fileExtension or ".c" in fileExtension or ".h" in fileExtension):
            return True
        return False


if ( __name__ == "__main__") {
    a = Toodles()
    a.walkAndList('.')
}   
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closed as too localized by LittleBobbyTables, Haidro, Dom, Yuushi, madth3 Jun 12 '13 at 23:25

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That's an interesting __main__ block. –  larsmans Jun 12 '13 at 15:24
2  
Others have pointed out the problem. I would like to add: (1) is there some reason why you use sys.stout.write instead of just print? (2) What purpose is served by class Toodles? What is a Toodles? You don't need a class to group related functionality, your module already serves that purpose. If you can't explain what a Toodles is and why those functions are methods of a Toodles object, then best just to implement them as straight-up functions. (3) Someone said this already, but the brackets in if (condition): (and similarly in your for loops) are superfluous. –  Hammerite Jun 12 '13 at 15:30
    
Thanks for the feedback. Like I said, I'm totally new to Python, so this is a learning experience. –  Moshe Jun 12 '13 at 15:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You missed a closing parenthesis:

 self.walkAndList(os.path.join(dirname, dirs)

Note that there are two opening, but only one closing parens.

Next problem is that you are using curly braces further down:

if ( __name__ == "__main__") {
    a = Toodles()
    a.walkAndList('.')
}

This is Python, not C, Java or Javascript; remove the braces and use a colon:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    a = Toodles()
    a.walkAndList('.')

Then you are using parenthesis in a for statement in a way that is not legal Python:

for (line in input):

Remove those parenthesis:

for line in input:

Next problem is that you don't define self for two of your methods:

def walkAndList(directory):

and

def listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(aFileName):

Add self as a first parameter:

def walkAndList(self, directory):
# ...
def listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(self, aFileName):

Next, you are treating the Toodles.isSourceFile() and Toodles.listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile() methods as globals, you need to add self. in front of these to call them as methods on the current instance:

if(isSourceFile(filename)):
    listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(filename)

should be (without the redundant parenthesis):

if self.isSourceFile(filename):
    self.listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(filename)

You then refer to filename (which is missing the path) where you wanted workingFilename instead (which includes the path):

self.listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(workingFilename)

or you'll get errors opening those files.

Then, your file extension testing is flawed; just use .endswith() to prevent matching files such as .csh or .h. Moreover, there is no need to first ask if to test if something is True, then separately return True or False; you can return the boolean test directly:

def isSourceFile(self, name):
    return name.endswith(('.m', '.c', '.h'))

When counting along when looping over sequences, use the enumerate() function to generate the counter for you:

for currentLine, line in enumerate(input, 1):
    line = line.lower()

counts lines, starting from 1.

Note that os.walk() already traverses subdirectories for you. There is no need to recurse again. Remove the recursion by removing the lines:

for dirs in dirnames:
    self.walkAndList(os.path.join(dirname, dirs))

With a few more improvements (use with to have the open file closed again, set needle outside the loop, filter early, use string formatting, write out the original line, not lowercased), the full script becomes:

import os
import sys


class Toodles(object):
    def walkAndList(self, directory):
        for dirname, dirnames, filenames in os.walk(directory):
            for filename in filenames:
                if self.isSourceFile(filename):
                    workingFilename = os.path.join(dirname, filename)
                    self.listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(workingFilename)

            # Advanced usage:
            # editing the 'dirnames' list will stop os.walk() from recursing into there.
            if '.git' in dirnames:
                # don't go into any .git directories.
                dirnames.remove('.git')

    #   Find occurences of "todo" and "fixme" in a file
    #   If we find such an occurence, print the filename,
    #   the line number, and the line itself.
    def listOccurrencesOfToDoInFile(self, aFileName):
        needle = "todo"
        with open(aFileName) as input:
            for currentLine, line in enumerate(input, 1):
                if needle in line.lower():
                    sys.stdout.write('{}: ({}){}'.format(aFileName, currentLine, line))

    #Todo: add a comment
    def isSourceFile(self, name):
        return name.endswith(('.m', '.c', '.h'))


if __name__ == "__main__":
    a = Toodles()
    a.walkAndList('.')
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