Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm feeding data to d3 via json in a format that looks like this:

[
   {
      "outcome_id":22,
      "history":[
         {
            "time":"2013-05-06T16:38:55+03:00",
            "balance_of_power":0.2
         },
         {
            "time":"2013-05-07T00:38:55+03:00",
            "balance_of_power":0.2222222222222222
         },
         {
            "time":"2013-05-07T08:38:55+03:00",
            "balance_of_power":0.36363636363636365
         }
      ],
      "winner":true,
      "name":"Pauline"
   },
   {
      "outcome_id":23,
      "history":[
         {
            "time":"2013-05-06T16:38:55+03:00",
            "balance_of_power":0.2
         },
         {
            "time":"2013-05-07T00:38:55+03:00",
            "balance_of_power":0.1111111111111111
         },
         {
            "time":"2013-05-07T08:38:55+03:00",
            "balance_of_power":0.09090909090909091
         }
      ],
      "winner":false,
      "name":"Romain"
   }
]

I use this data to draw both a multiple series line chart (to show the evolution of "balance_of_power" through time) and a donut chart to represent the latest value of "balance_of_power" for all series.

So each top-level array element is an object that has several attributes, one of them being "history", which is itself an array of objects (that have the time and balance_of_power attributes).

A working example can be found here.

To produce the data for the donut chart I use a function that takes the latest element from each history array (the data is sorted by time) and generate another attribute that's called "last_balance".

For example the first element becomes:

{
   "outcome_id":22,
   "history":[...],
   "winner":true,
   "name":"Pauline",
   "last_balance":0.36363636363636365
}

And then I specify the right accessor from the pie layout value:

pie = d3.layout.pie().value(function(d) { return d.latest_balance; })

Now I'd like to get rid of the extra step and change the accessor function so that I can read the value directly form the initial data structure and also be able to access any balance_of_power for a time given as an argument.

Is there a way to do that with only modifying the accessor of pie value ?

EDIT

I changed the .value function to this:

.value(function(d) {
  var h = d.history[0];
  d.history.forEach(function(elt, i, a) {
    console.log("======"); // start debug
    console.log("search for:"+selected_time.toString());
    console.log("current value:"+d.history[i].time.toString());
    console.log("test:"+(d.history[i].time == selected_time));
    console.log("======"); // end debug
    if(d.history[i].time == selected_time) {
      h = d.history[i];
    }
  });
  return h.balance_of_power;
})

But the comparison always fails, even when the values seem to be identical, so the previous code always returns the initial value.

Here's what the javascript console shows for the last iteration:

====== final_balance_donut_chart.js?body=1:11
search for:Thu Jun 06 2013 16:06:00 GMT+0200 (CEST) final_balance_donut_chart.js?body=1:12
current value:Thu Jun 06 2013 16:06:00 GMT+0200 (CEST) final_balance_donut_chart.js?body=1:13
test:false final_balance_donut_chart.js?body=1:14
====== 

EDIT 2

For some reason I had to convert both times to string to make this work.

Here is the final code fore .value:

.value(function(d) {
  var h = d.history[0];
  d.history.forEach(function(elt) {
    if(elt.time.toString() == selected_time.toString()) {
      h = elt;
    }
  });
  return h.balance_of_power;
})
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Yes, your code would look something like this.

time = "...";
pie = d3.layout.pie()
        .value(function(d) {
            var h = d.history[0];
            for(var i = 0; i < d.history.length; i++) {
                if(d.history[i].time == time) {
                    h = d.history[i];
                    break;
                }
            }
            return h.balance_of_power;
        });

You will need to handle the case when the time is not in the history though.

share|improve this answer
    
The for loop did not seem to be entered in so I replaced it with a d.history.forEach but the first value of h is always returned because the time comparison always return false. –  Daniel Ristic Jun 12 '13 at 16:59
    
You need to pass in exactly the string you have in one of the time attributes for it to match. As I've said, you need to handle the case when no match is found. –  Lars Kotthoff Jun 12 '13 at 17:01
    
For some reason I had to convert both times to strings to make the comparison work. –  Daniel Ristic Jun 13 '13 at 9:52
    
Sounds like the time you were passing in was an actual time object instead of a string. You can do that as well of course, but then you would need to parse the time strings in the JSON into time objects. –  Lars Kotthoff Jun 13 '13 at 9:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.