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I have simple structure with container and inside boxes:

<div id="container">
    <div class="block"></div>
    // more blocks
    <div class="block"></div>
</div>

What I would like to achieve is to center boxes inside this container but to pack them as much as possible in a one line. The same I can do using JS: http://jsfiddle.net/JhxSd/ but I would like to avoid that, and use only CSS. Is that possible?

share|improve this question
    
The number of block inside container is fixed ? – Simone Pessotto Jun 12 '13 at 16:18
    
Unfortunately not - sometimes it may be only 1 block, sometimes 25 of them. – Paweł Fus Jun 12 '13 at 16:26
up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

@media queries

Use a set of @media queries to define different layouts for the grid based on the current screen size. The only part of the layout that needs to vary is the width of the grid wrapper.

For all practical purposes, this is the only CSS solution available at present. For an explanation of why @media queries are appropriate, and why other available CSS options won't work, see this answer.

JSFiddle Demo

The above demo has @media queries for screen sizes up to 1200px wide (more can be added as needed), and does not use JavaScript. The rendered width of #container is always 75% (not counting the border), and the grid is centered within #container.

Note: This solution requires adding a wrapper div around the blocks. In each @media query, the width of the wrapper is just enough to fit the number of columns appropriate for the current screen size. The fixed wrapper width is what allows the grid as a whole to be centered within #container. If editing the static HTML isn't an option, the wrapper div can be added when the page loads using jQuery.

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div class="grid-wrapper">
        <div class="block"></div>
        ...
    </div>
</div>

CSS

#container {
    width: 75%;
    ...
}
.grid-wrapper {
    margin: 0 auto;
    width: 70px;   /* Default: 1 column */
}
@media (min-width: 200px) {
    .grid-wrapper {width: 140px;}   /* 2 columns */
}
@media (min-width: 290px) {
    .grid-wrapper {width: 210px;}   /* 3 columns */
}
...
share|improve this answer
    
I need container with width set as percentage, so it's not possible to setup. I need solution exactly the same as in example with JS. – Paweł Fus Jun 15 '13 at 22:47
    
@PawełFus: Is this demo what you need? This uses @media queries and no JavaScript. In this demo, the rendered width of #container is always 75%, and the grid is centered within #container. It supports any number of grid items, and additional @media queries can be added to support any range of screen sizes. – Matt Coughlin Jun 16 '13 at 4:27
    
Exactly! Wasn't thinking about wrapper, that's what I need. Thanks, I will add bounty when be allowed. – Paweł Fus Jun 16 '13 at 12:34

I hope this will do the trick:

http://jsfiddle.net/CnjZR/1/

<div id="container">
<div id="wrap">
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
    <div class="block"></div>
</div>

CSS:

#container {
width: 100%;
overflow: hidden;
background: red;
    text-align: center;
}
.block {
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    background: blue;
    float: left;
    margin: 5px;
}

#wrap {
    background: green;
    overflow: hidden;
    display: inline-block;
}
share|improve this answer
    
With bigger boxes, you can see that right margin/padding isn't the same as for left one: jsfiddle.net/CnjZR/2 – Paweł Fus Jun 12 '13 at 16:34
    
Basically the point is to set up a wrapper div, set it to 'display: inline-block' and set it parent to 'text-align: center'. – Alan Piralla Jun 12 '13 at 16:35
    
Yeah, too bad. Should I delete my answer in this case? – Alan Piralla Jun 12 '13 at 16:36
    
Maybe you have another idea, so you cna update answer :) – Paweł Fus Jun 12 '13 at 16:44
    
This is about as good as it gets with pure css, there is no way to have "justified" width elements so that it always fits perfectly. The best you can do is play with the block size until it fits nicely and keep them all a uniform size. ie: jsfiddle.net/CnjZR/3 – bitwiser Jun 15 '13 at 18:44

Not too sure if you where looking for something like 'flex-justify' , I added in the demo a turn around based on inline-boxes behavior and text-align values.

edit : point cleared: text-align:center ; is it. http://jsfiddle.net/JhxSd/10/

The point is you should not use float, but display.

Float is not friendly with centering , nor vertical nor horizontal, since it is not standing in the natural flow of the document.

 #container {
    width: 75%;
    border: 1px solid;
    text-align:center;
    overflow:hidden;
    padding:1em 1em 0;
    box-sizing:border-box;
    float:left;
}

#container .block {
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;
    background-color: blue;
    display:inline-block;
    margin: 10px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using float, because I want to 'start' them from left side. For example, when width is set to 500px, I have boxes on both sides. So justifying text won't work for that case. – Paweł Fus Jun 15 '13 at 19:36
    
oki, jsfiddle.net/JhxSd/4 . (i still understand you want lines with enough content to reach each sides. If not, remove text-align, float is unecessary here :) – GCyrillus Jun 15 '13 at 19:49
    
Maybe, I'm missing something, but this is not what I need to achieve: jsfiddle.net/JhxSd/9 At margin left and right aren't the same. – Paweł Fus Jun 15 '13 at 22:50
    
seems like your problem is similar to that one. stackoverflow.com/questions/16891138/… you need a clear break at the end of each lines to wrap it , else text-align justify will help, adapting space in between elements as inline-boxes . not compatible with float. I do not really understand what you want or don't. – GCyrillus Jun 15 '13 at 23:10
    
I want something exaclty the same as in myjsFiddle, but without using JS. Link you provided isn't the same - there, user want to cut off extra space in container. I want to center boxes in container. Sorry, for not being clear! – Paweł Fus Jun 15 '13 at 23:20

I think, everything you have almost done already.

#container {
    width: 75%;
    border: 1px solid;
    float: left;
}
#container .block {
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;    
    background-color: blue;
    float: left;
    margin: 10px;
    overflow: hidden;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/JhxSd/3/

share|improve this answer
    
How is this different from @GCyrillus'a answer? – Paweł Fus Jun 15 '13 at 23:15

Try this:

#container {
    width: 75%;
    border: 1px solid;
    float: left;
    overflow: hidden;
    text-align: center;
}
#container .block {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;    
    background-color: blue;
    margin: 10px;
}

If you truly need everything left-aligned then I think you're out of luck with just CSS.

share|improve this answer

You can use the text-align:justify for the container and use the display:inline-block for the div.block. but you need add some placeholder tag at the last.Like this:

HTML

<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="block">1</div>
  <div class="block">2</div>
  <div class="block">3</div>
  <div class="block">4</div>
  <div class="block">5</div>
  <div class="block">6</div>
  <div class="block">7</div>
  <div class="block">8</div>
  <div class="block">9</div>
  <div class="block">10</div>
  <div class="block">11</div>
  <div class="block">12</div>
  <div class="block">13</div>
  <div class="block">14</div>
  <div class="block">15</div>
    <div class="placeholder"></div>
    <div class="placeholder"></div>
    <div class="placeholder"></div>
    <div class="placeholder"></div>
    <div class="placeholder"></div>
    <div class="placeholder"></div>
</div>

CSS

.wrapper {
  width: 75%;
  border: 1px solid;
  font-size: 0.1px;
  text-align: justify;
}
.wrapper:after {
  content:"";
  display:inline-block;
  width: 100%;
}

.wrapper div{  
    font-size: 16px;
    display:inline-block;
    *display: inline;
    zoom:1;
    color: #fff;
    background-color:blue; 
    width: 50px; 
    height: 50px; 
    margin: 10px; 
}
.wrapper .placeholder {
  width: 50px;
  height: 0px;
  background:none;
}

Please view the demo. A detailed tutorial, please click here.

share|improve this answer
    
Margin between blocks isn't always the same. – Paweł Fus Jun 16 '13 at 12:35
    
You can use the flexbox module. – Airen Jun 16 '13 at 13:14
    
From CSS3? Is that possible to work with that flexible won't be displayed outside container, but inside: jsfiddle.net/JhxSd/70 ? – Paweł Fus Jun 16 '13 at 13:46
    
you can view the demo, i have changed your demo:codepen.io/airen/pen/fqECc – Airen Jun 16 '13 at 14:03
    
Sorry, but boxes doesn't start from left side, and sometimes we have justified, like in first answer by @GCyrillus. – Paweł Fus Jun 16 '13 at 15:11

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