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I have to create a hexagon and I really want it to be full HTML and CSS. It is almost done, except the fact that it is not fully symmetric. The left corner is not aligned with the right corner. The current css:

.hexagon.outer {
    width: 318px;
    height: 452px;
    position: relative;
}
.hexagon.outer, .hexagon.outer:before, .hexagon.outer:after {
   background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-color: #585858;
}
.hexagon.outer:before, .hexagon.outer:after {
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    width: 262px;
    height: 262px;
    top:95px;
    -moz-transform: rotate(54.5deg) skew(22.5deg);
    -webkit-transform: rotate(54.5deg) skew(22.5deg);
    transform: rotate(54.5deg) skew(22.5deg);
}
.hexagon.outer:before {
    left: -130px;
}
.hexagon.outer:after {
    left: 186px;
}
.hexagon.outer span {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100px;
    height: 55px;
    background:#585858;
    z-index: 1;
}

.hexagon.inner {
    width: 276px;
    height: 372px;
    position: relative;
    margin:0 auto;
    top: 40px;
    z-index:4;

}
.hexagon.inner, .hexagon.inner:before, .hexagon.inner:after {
   background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-color: white;
}
.hexagon.inner:before, .hexagon.inner:after {   
    content: "";
    padding:0;
    margin:0;
    position: absolute;
    width: 215px;
    height: 215px;
    top:79px;
    -moz-transform: rotate(54.5deg) skew(22.5deg);
    -webkit-transform: rotate(54.7deg) skew(22.5deg);
    transform: rotate(54.7deg) skew(22.5deg);
}

.hexagon.inner:before {
    left: -107px;
}
.hexagon.inner:after {
    left: 169px;
}
.hexagon.inner span {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100px;
    height: 55px;
    background:#585858;
    z-index: 1;
}

The HTML:

<div class="hexagon outer">
   <div class="hexagon inner">

   </div>
</div>

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/jK7sH/

The outer hexagon will have an (background) effect in the end, that is why there are two (inner and outer).

I tried to align them by trial and error, but I don't think that works because the :before and :after rectangles are skewed.

Is it possible to create a symmetric hexagon with just CSS without the use of borders?

Thanks in advance for all information!

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you just use an SVG background image? SVG was designed for such things. Failing that, you could use CSS gradients as a background. –  David Storey Jun 12 '13 at 17:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

hexagone is 8 sides , isn't it ?

you could give a try with background linear-gradient http://dabblet.com/gist/5767212

hover them to and see how it reacts while width increase.

share|improve this answer
2  
No! Hex = 6 Oct = 8 (hexagon: 6 sided; hexane: 6 carbon hydrocarbon vs. octagon: 8 sided; octane: 8 carbon hydrocarbon) –  ChrisW Jun 12 '13 at 17:43
3  
oh my god , i feel ashame :) –  GCyrillus Jun 12 '13 at 17:50
    
Thank you for your advice, but the link does not show me a hexagon. This can be, because of the website Dabblet and my browser compatibility (Chrome 27.0 Mac) or something (the code at the bottom doesn't always appear either :S)... Your technique seems promising and I will try it in the morning! Thanks again and if it works, I will let you know! –  fps Jun 12 '13 at 20:19
    
I've tried and accomplished a hexagon with gradients. Now, I need to get it more squarelike, is this possible? Next to that, I need an glance effect. Is it possible to use multiple gradients in an effect? If so, why is only the top gradient showing when hovering? I created a fiddle: jsfiddle.net/72FXX/1 –  fps Jun 15 '13 at 16:22
1  
To have animation or transition taking over a rule set, it needs to match numbers of value to take effect. jsfiddle.net/zXwPc –  GCyrillus Jun 15 '13 at 16:52

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