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I'm learning design patterns from 'Head First' series. The book is a bit outdated (no generic types ), so I'm trying to rewrite some of it. I'm supposed to write Wrapper on Iterator to work like Enumerator methods and test it with ArrayList.

The "original" version looked like this(below). I've tried to make it generic class such as <E> or even <T<E>>, but it didn't work. I want to be also sure that it will work for any kind of iterator, not only ArrayList like ArrayList<T>. What is the proper way to implement this ?

public class IteratorWrapper implements Enumeration {
    Iterator iterator;

    public IteratorWrapper(Iterator iterator){
        this.iterator = iterator;
    }

    public boolean hasMoreElements(){
        return iterator.hasNext();
    }

    //Return generic Type T 
    public Object nextElement(){
        return iterator.next();
    }
}

Test class

public class WrapperTest {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        ArrayList<String> arrayList = new ArrayList<String>();
        arrayList.add("element1");
        arrayList.add("element2");

        //This part will be rewritten when wrapper will work  
        IteratorWrapper iteratorWrapper = new IteratorWrapper(arrayList.iterator());

        while(iteratorWrapper.hasMoreElements()){
            System.out.println(iteratorWrapper.nextElement());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What did you try? What error did you get? – SLaks Jun 12 '13 at 17:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can add a generic parameter like this:

public class IteratorWrapper<T> implements Enumeration<T> {
    Iterator<T> iterator;

    public IteratorWrapper(Iterator<T> iterator){
        this.iterator = iterator;
    }

    public boolean hasMoreElements(){
        return iterator.hasNext();
    }

    public T nextElement(){
        return iterator.next();
    }
}

Then, your initialization will look like this:

IteratorWrapper<String> iteratorWrapper = new IteratorWrapper<String>(arrayList.iterator());
share|improve this answer
    
Strange... I tried the exact copy of this, but It threw me error. I guess the problem was in creating object and passing iterator to it. Btw. I tried also this IteratorWrapper<ArrayList<String>> iteratorWrapper = new IteratorWrapper<ArrayList<String>>(arrayList.iterator()); and It works - but... is it also proper way to init my object ? – ashur Jun 12 '13 at 17:20
1  
@ashur: No; your iterator is not returning ArrayLists. Read the compiler warnings. – SLaks Jun 12 '13 at 17:23
    
It doesn't compile with Eclispe and Java 6. Anyway the point is that your wrapper (and the iterator) don't have to know that the iterator comes from an ArrayList, so the generic type doesn't need to mention ArrayList – Guillaume Jun 12 '13 at 17:26
    
@Guillaume Thanks, now I get it. – ashur Jun 12 '13 at 17:29

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