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consider a signal handler that call exit() as last instruction: is safe to call non-reentrant functions (e.g. free()) in that handler?

IMHO it would be legal due to the fact that the handler does not return to the normal sequence of execution.

Thank you in advance.

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3 Answers 3

No, this is illegal, more then that, there are very few safe functions to call.

There is a list of safe functions to call, see http://linux.die.net/man/2/signal Notes section.

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Reentrancy as more to do with the "entrance" to a function and, side-effects and state maintained by the said function than the exit...

You might want to consult this man page.

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You must distinguish between two signals: Those which tell the daemon to "reload" and those which terminate the daemon ("kill"). In the "kill" case, you don't need to free anything. Your process is going to die, the OS will clean up anything you have allocated. If you use shared memory, you must do the cleanup when you're started again. Don't do anything in the "kill" handler which might cause problems. Just die.

In the reload case, you can call any function you like since the user wants you to "shut down orderly". In this case, there is little chance that you will get the same signal again (so it doesn't matter whether a function is reentrant or not).

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Ok, thank you. This project is for an exam. I was worried about leaving a malloc() without free() :) –  Marco Nov 10 '09 at 12:44
    
Incorrect. If the signal interrupted some code that acquires a lock, and then the signal handler tries to acquire the same lock, your program will hang. I saw this happen once when a signal interrupted free() and then the signal handler called free(). –  Posco Grubb Sep 28 '11 at 2:12
    
@Posco Grubb: Interesting; how do I prevent this in C? The signal SIGHUP can arrive at any time. How can I make sure that I don't call "dangerous" functions? –  Aaron Digulla Sep 28 '11 at 15:31
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@Aaron: You can't prevent a signal from interrupting a non-reentrant function. But you can make sure that your signal handlers do not call non-reentrant functions. chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemnet/use/info/libc/libc_toc.html#TOC360 –  Posco Grubb Jan 22 '12 at 8:54

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