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I'm trying to understand how the this keyword works in this context.

function Person(name) {
    this.name = name;
    this.sayName = function() {
        alert('My name is ' + this.name);
    };
}


var p = new Person('Smith');
p.sayName();  // 'My name is Smith'

var q = p;

q.sayName();  // 'My name is Smith'

q = p.sayName;

q();  // 'My name is'   ???

Why is the last example not picking up 'Smith'?

Is it because q is simply pointing to a function (i.e. the object the method belongs to is not recognized in this context)? Since q is in the global space, this is global within the function (i.e. the caller of sayName() is the global space or window)?

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marked as duplicate by apsillers, Ian, Paul S., Qantas 94 Heavy, TimWolla Mar 1 '14 at 1:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Because it all depends on how the function is called. In your last example, it has no context, so this is actually window. To overcome this problem, put var that = this; inside your Person function. Then, use that throughout to refer to the specific Person instances –  Ian Jun 12 '13 at 19:54
4  
this inside the a function is determined at invocation time depending on how the function was invoked. p.sayName() and q() are different styles of invocation; the first is as a method of an object, the second as a "raw" function call. –  apsillers Jun 12 '13 at 19:54
    
I thought q = p.sayName created context, because sayName() is part of p. So, assigning a variable to a method, even if it looks like it is part of an object, is just creating a raw function call. –  Stephen Jun 12 '13 at 20:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's because this refers to the context that the function is called from. When you do p.sayName() the context is p. If you just call a function without context, it will default to the global context (usually window) or undefined in strict mode.

If you want to make it work the way you were expecting you can bind this to p, so that q():

q = p.sayName.bind(p);

q(); // My name is Smith
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Piggybacking on what @Paulpro said, you can create a reference to the Person() context by adding var that = this; inside the class. That way you could call that.name from inside the function.

function Person(name) 
{
    var that = this;

    this.name = name;
    this.sayName = function() 
    {
        alert('My name is ' + that.name);
    };
}


var p = new Person('Smith');
p.sayName();  // 'My name is Smith'

var q = p;

q.sayName();  // 'My name is Smith'

q = p.sayName;

q();  // 'My name is Smith'


View jsFiddle demo

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