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This is my first time working with pointers to function.

What I'm trying to do is create a function called essay, that gets a pointer to another function , an integer num, and then num doubles.

The function essay, will multiply the arguments, and then return the value of the function i recieved as an argument, with the product.

This sounds complex but it really is quite simple. Example:

essay(sin,2,pi,1/2) will return the value of sin(pi/2)

this is my code...for some reason it doesnt let me send the pointer to the function sin. Says no instance of overloaded function sin matches argument list, but this is exactly how i saw my teacher do it...I think.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <math.h>
double (*pfunc)(double);
double essay(double* pfunc(double),double num, ... )
{
    int i;
    double product=1,result;
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments,num);
    for(i=0;i<num;i++)
        product*=va_arg(arguments,double);
    va_end(arguments);
    result=*(pfunc(product));
    return result;
}
void main()
{
    double x,y;
    x=3.14159265358979323846;
    y=0.5;
    printf("%lf",essay(sin,2,x,y));
    getch();
}
share|improve this question
    
why not define your PI (x) value like this #define _USE_MATH_DEFINES and in code use M_PI ? just a sidenote. –  Kyslik Jun 12 '13 at 20:26
2  
You're also using a C++ compiler to compiler C code. Don't do that! (and main() should return int). –  Carl Norum Jun 12 '13 at 20:28
    
The second argument to essay should be an int, not a double. What are you going to do if it is called with 3.5 as the number of arguments to process? Also, when you've fixed the type of your function pointer argument as discussed in the answers, you could either write result = pfunc(product); or result = (*pfunc)(product); to evaluate the function. You need the * where it is because of the extraneous * in your function definition. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 12 '13 at 20:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

this is wrong

double essay(double* pfunc(double),double num, ... )

Here you're passing a function as a parameter which return a pointer to double, that not make sense, should be:

 double essay(double (*pfunc)(double),double num, ... )

Here you're passing a pointer to a function which returns a double and receive a double as a parameter

share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't it be **? –  Kyslik Jun 12 '13 at 20:28
    
It worked! Thanks DGomez. –  Oria Gruber Jun 12 '13 at 20:29
    
@Kyslik, no it shouldn't. –  Carl Norum Jun 12 '13 at 20:29
    
@Kyslik double* (*pfunc)(double) if you mean this, is a pointer to a function which returns a pointer to double, is not the same thing –  DGomez Jun 12 '13 at 20:31
    
Yes that is what I meant and now I see I was really wrong. Didn't do much in C lately. –  Kyslik Jun 12 '13 at 21:43
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <math.h>
// removed extra var
double essay(double (*pfunc)(double), double num, ...) // added parens
{
    int i;
    double product = 1, result;
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, num);
    for (i = 0; i < num; i++)
    product *= va_arg(arguments, double);
    va_end(arguments);
    result = pfunc(product); // removed extra parens
    return result;
}

void main()
{
    double x, y;
    x = 3.14159265358979323846;
    y = 0.5;
    printf("%lf", essay(sin, 2, x, y));
}
share|improve this answer

This is what I'd do, assuming a C99 compiler that accepts variable declarations in for loops and at arbitrary points in a block of code. Note the use of the typedef for the function pointer type (MathFunc2 would be for a function that takes two arguments, etc), and the use of int (rather than double) for the number of values in the argument list.

#include <math.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef double (*MathFunc1)(double);

static double essay(MathFunc1 function, int num, ...)
{
    double product = 1.0;
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, num);
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
        product *= va_arg(arguments, double);
    va_end(arguments);
    double result = (*function)(product);
    return result;
}

int main(void)
{
    double x = 3.14159265358979323846;  // M_PI?
    double y = 0.5;
    printf("%f\n", essay(sin, 2, x, y));
}
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