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The key bindings I've defined in my .emacs file aren't working. Here's the file:

;init modes
(menu-bar-mode 0)
(tool-bar-mode 0)
(cua-mode)
(column-number-mode)
(fset 'perl-mode 'cperl-mode)
(cperl-set-style PerlStyle)

;keymappings
(global-set-key [f12] 'save-buffer)
(global-set-key [S-f12] 'write-file)
(global-set-key [f7] 'ispell)
(global-set-key [up] 'scroll-one-line-up)
(global-set-key [down] 'scroll-one-line-down)

;functions
(defun scroll-one-line-up (&optional arg)
  (interactive "p")
  (scroll-up (or arg 1)))
(defun scroll-one-line-down (&optional arg)
  (interactive "p")
  (scroll-down (or arg 1)))

I know Emacs parses the file since everything else seems to work. It's just that the keys are not being bound.

How can I make it work?

share|improve this question
    
Jari Aalto has an excellent (and exhaustive) guide to binding keys: nongnu.org/emacs-tiny-tools/keybindings – Joe Casadonte Nov 11 '09 at 2:09
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have an error in your .emacs at line:

(cperl-set-style PerlStyle)

It should be written as:

(cperl-set-style 'PerlStyle)

Since it raises an error that stops parsing .emacs at that point, your key bindings won't be evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Török, although the problem wasn't quite that. The cperl-set-style function only exists if cperl-mode has been run. So that was the line that is giving me a parsing error. Do you happen to know a good reference on how to run functions conditionally with respect to the mode? – gvkv Nov 10 '09 at 19:04
1  
@gvkv: You're looking for mode hooks. See emacswiki.org/emacs/ModeHooks for more info. Something like this should do the trick: (add-hook 'cperl-mode-hook (lambda () (cperl-set-style 'PerlStyle))) – Boojum Nov 10 '09 at 21:22
    
Cool. Thanks Boojum. – gvkv Nov 10 '09 at 21:48
1  
Also, emacs --debug-init would help diagnose this. – Joe Casadonte Nov 11 '09 at 2:07
    
@Joe: I just tried this and it's been helpful. Thanks – gvkv Nov 11 '09 at 15:18

To follow up to my previous answer, you would have to change the binding in the local keymap using a hook variable. Here's an example that I use with java-mode:

(defun java-setup ()
   (setq tab-stop-list '(4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92)
         indent-tabs-mode nil
         tab-width 4
         fill-column 96
         c-comment-start-regexp "\\(@\\|/\\(/\\|[*][*]?\\)\\)"))

 (add-hook 'java-mode-hook 'java-setup)

In your case you would use something like:

 (defun mysetup ()
    (define-key local-map [f12] 'func))

 (add-hook 'your-mode-hook 'mysetup)

Also, fwiw, I do the following to define my global keys:

(defun function-key-help ()
  (interactive)
  (switch-to-buffer "*Help*")
  (erase-buffer)
  (insert-file (expand-file-name "~/lib/fkeys.help"))
  (message "Type C-x b <nl> to remove help window."))

(define-key global-map [f12] 'function-key-help)

And it works perfectly in my Emacs 23 setup.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quickie tutorial. I'm going to try this tonight. – gvkv Nov 10 '09 at 21:52

It is hard to say what your problem might be without more information, like is it all your keybindings or just one or two that do not work. I will hazard a guess that it is the last two ([up] and [down]). In those cases the on-line documentation below seems to indicate that you might be shadowing the global definitions with local ones defined by the mode.

global-set-key is an interactive compiled Lisp function in `subr.el'.

(global-set-key key command)

Give key a global binding as command. command is the command definition to use; usually it is a symbol naming an interactively-callable function. key is a key sequence; noninteractively, it is a string or vector of characters or event types, and non-ASCII characters with codes above 127 (such as ISO Latin-1) can be included if you use a vector.

Note that if key has a local binding in the current buffer, that local binding will continue to shadow any global binding that you make with this function.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that the local mapping is the problem since C-h k <F12>, for example, returns "<F12> is undefined". If by chance it is, however, what do I do about it? – gvkv Nov 10 '09 at 18:50
    
You would have to change the binding in the local keymap using a hook variable. Here's an example that I use with java-mode: (defun java-setup () (setq tab-stop-list '(4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92) indent-tabs-mode nil tab-width 4 fill-column 96 c-comment-start-regexp "\(@\\|/\(/\\|[][]?\)\)")) (add-hook 'java-mode-hook 'java-setup) In your case you would use something like: (defun mysetup () (define-key local-map [f12] 'func)) (add-hook 'your-mode-hook 'mysetup) – pajato0 Nov 10 '09 at 21:08
    
That was a bad idea. I'll redo my comment as another answer to make it clearer. – pajato0 Nov 10 '09 at 21:09

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