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Under what circumstances can code wrapped in a System.Transactions.TransactionScope still commit, even though an exception was thrown and the outermost scope never had commit called?

There is a top-level method wrapped in using (var tx = new TransactionScope()), and that calls methods that also use TransactionScope in the same way.

I'm using typed datasets with associated tableadapters. Could it be that the commands in the adapter aren't enlisting for some reason? Do any of you know how one might check whether they are enlisting in the ambient TransactionScope or not?

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is there a nested transaction? –  almog.ori Nov 10 '09 at 12:28
    
Well, TransactionScope is nested, yes. There is a top-level method wrapped in using (var tx = new TransactionScope()), and that calls methods that also use TransactionScope. –  Neil Barnwell Nov 10 '09 at 12:30
    
What is the database here? –  Marc Gravell Nov 10 '09 at 16:04
    
SQL Server 2005. –  Neil Barnwell Nov 10 '09 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The answer turned out to be because I was creating the TransactionScope object after the SqlConnection object.

I moved from this:

using (new ConnectionScope())
using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
{
    // Do something that modifies data

    transaction.Complete();
}

to this:

using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
using (new ConnectionScope())
{
    // Do something that modifies data

    transaction.Complete();
}

and now it works!

So the moral of the story is to create your TransactionScope first.

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1  
It also shows the value of posting code ;-p We might have spotted it for you; never mind - sorted now. –  Marc Gravell Nov 10 '09 at 16:53
1  
Yeah but I couldn't do that in this case, as the app is too complex, and I hadn't replicated it in a smaller example. –  Neil Barnwell Nov 10 '09 at 17:18
3  
I think you can create the SqlConnection first (in case you need to pass it around to methods that all use TransactionScope. In the situation where you have an existing connection already and want to create a transaction scope, you can just call connection.ElistTransaction( Transaction.Current ) inside the using block for the scope. –  Triynko May 21 '10 at 17:35
    
Couple of hours saved.. thx. –  Aseem Gautam Sep 8 '10 at 8:21

The obvious scenario would be where a new (RequiresNew) / null (Suppress) transaction is explicitly specified - but there is also a timeout/unbinding glitch that can cause connections to miss the transaction. See this earlier post (the fix is just a connection-string change), or full details.

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I tried the connection string change earlier on while researching my problem and it didn't help in this case. I think I might have RequiresNew somewhere, so I'll take a look. –  Neil Barnwell Nov 10 '09 at 14:04
    
I'm using typed datasets with associated tableadapters. Could it be that the commands in the adapter aren't enlisting for some reason? Do you know how one might check whether they are enlisting in the ambient TransactionScope or not? –  Neil Barnwell Nov 10 '09 at 15:03
    
I found the answer in the end - to do with the order that transactionscope and connection objects are created. I've added my answer to this post. –  Neil Barnwell Nov 10 '09 at 16:17

Be aware how TransactionScope works:
It sets property System.Transactions.Transaction.Current at the begining of using scope and then set it back to previous value at end of using scope.

Previous value depends on where given scope is declared. It can be inside another scope.


You can modify code like this:

using (var sqlConnection = new ConnectionScope())
using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
{
    sqlConnection.EnlistTransaction(System.Transactions.Transaction.Current);
    // Do something that modifies data
    transaction.Complete();
}

I show this possibility for those who have their code more complicated and cannot simply change code to open DB connection first.

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