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I am trying to use a buffer class instantiated in shared memory. There is one sole writer process that writes to that object in shared memory, and one sole reader (so no need to use synchronization).

Could somebody point out why reading from the shared memory is unexpected values? Please note that the source code below was compiled and tested on a 32 bit machine running Debian Linux using g++ compiler.

I have written a test minimal example and the files are given below. The template buffer class header file:

// file testbuffer.h
#ifndef _TESTBUFFER_H_
#define _TESTBUFFER_H_

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>


//our data type
typedef struct tagSTT{
    int x;
    float y;
    char c;
} STT;

#define DATANUM 2048



template <typename T, int nCapacity >
    class CBuff {
 public:
    CBuff ();
    ~CBuff ();
    bool pop(T *  pVal);
    bool push(T const * const pVal);
 private:
    /*! memory buffer*/
    T *m_pBuff;
    T m_aBuff[nCapacity];
    volatile int m_nCapacity;
    //Read index. Always points to the item index right after the previously read. Initially = 0.
    volatile int m_nR;
    //Write index. Always points to the location right after the previously written to. Initially = 0.
    volatile int m_nW;
};

template <typename T, int nCapacity >
    CBuff<T, nCapacity>::CBuff () {
    m_pBuff = NULL;
    m_nCapacity = nCapacity;
    m_nR = 0;
    m_nW = 0;
    m_pBuff = m_aBuff;
    memset((void *)m_pBuff, 0, sizeof(T) * m_nCapacity);
}

template <typename T, int nCapacity >
    CBuff<T, nCapacity>::~CBuff(){
}

template <typename T, int nCapacity >
    bool CBuff<T, nCapacity>::pop(T *  pVal) {
    if (m_nR == m_nW){//nothing new to read
        return false;
    }
    int nNextR = (m_nR + 1) % m_nCapacity;
    (*pVal) = m_pBuff[m_nR];
    m_nR = nNextR;
    return true;
}
template <typename T, int nCapacity >
    bool CBuff<T, nCapacity>::push(T const * const pVal){
    int nNextW = (m_nW + 1) % m_nCapacity;
    if (nNextW != m_nR) {//buffer is not full
        m_pBuff[m_nW] = *pVal;
        m_nW = nNextW;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
#endif 

Next, here is program file that creates a sharem memory, instantiates the buffer in that memory and then starts some test data into the buffer.

//Test program. *Only* writes to the shared memory buffer. 
//Comile with:
// g++ -g -pedantic -Wall -I ./ fillbuff.cpp -o fillbuff -lrt

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <pthread.h>


#include <testbuffer.h>


int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    CBuff < STT, DATANUM> DBuff;//to get size of our whole data object
    CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *pDBuff = NULL;

    int fd = 0;
    char ShmName[1024];
    bzero(ShmName, sizeof(ShmName));
    strcpy(ShmName, "/MyShm");
    size_t ShmSize = sizeof(DBuff);

    shm_unlink(ShmName);//incase it is lying around after a previous crash
    fd = shm_open(ShmName, O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666);
    if (fd < 0){
        return -10;
    }
    //set the size of the shared mem ob
    if (ftruncate(fd, ShmSize) == -1){
        return -11;
    }

    CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *pShm = NULL; 
    //map the file into the address space of the process
    pShm = (CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *) mmap(0, ShmSize, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);
    if (pShm == (CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *)-1){
        std::cerr << "ERROR mapping GUI shared memory" << std::endl;
        return -12;
    }
    pDBuff = new (pShm)CBuff < STT, DATANUM>;

    STT Data;
    memset((void *)&Data, 0, sizeof(STT));
    std::string sTmp;
    int n = 0;
    //start population data inout our buffer
    for (n = 0; n < 29; n++) {
        Data.x = n;
        Data.y = float(n)/100;
        Data.c = 'R';
        std::clog << Data.x << " " 
                  << Data.y << " " 
                  << Data.c << std::endl;
        if (pShm->push(&Data) == false){
            std::cerr << "Could not push data sample " << n << " on to CB" << std::endl;
        } 
        usleep(500000);//wait
    }

    pDBuff->~CBuff();
    //unmap the memory
    if (munmap(pShm, ShmSize) < 0){
        std::cerr << "ERROR unmapping common memory" << std::endl;
        return -20;
    }
    close (fd);
    shm_unlink(ShmName);



    return 0;
}

Finally, this program, which must be started after the above program has been started, reads values off the shared memory and prints them out. The values read are not the ones I am saving in the buffer filler above. What am I missing here? Thanks.

//Test program, *only* read from the shared memory buffer.
//compile with:
//g++ -g  -Wall -I ./ emptybuff.cpp -o emptybuff.cpp -o emptybuff  -lrt
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#include <testbuffer.h>

int main () {

    char ShmName[1024];
    bzero(ShmName, sizeof(ShmName));
    strcpy(ShmName, "/MyShm");
    size_t ShmSize = sizeof(CBuff < STT, DATANUM>);
    int fd = shm_open(ShmName, O_RDWR, 0666);
    if (fd < 0){
        std::cerr << "Could not get a fd." << std::endl;
        return -10;
    }
    CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *pBuff = NULL;
    STT D;//will hold a sample
    pBuff = (CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *) mmap(0, ShmSize, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);
    if (pBuff == (CBuff < STT, DATANUM> *) -1){
        std::cerr << "Could not map shm" << std::endl;
        return -1;
    }
    //read off the data from the buffer (which should already be filling up)
    int k = 0;
    for (k = 0; k < 10; k++) {
        pBuff->pop(&D);//get a sample from the buffer
        //print it out
        std::clog << D.x << " " 
                  << D.y << " " 
                  << D.c << std::endl;
        usleep(750000);//wait and lag behind the buffer filler process.
    }
    close (fd);
    shm_unlink(ShmName);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Storing a pointer inside a data structure in shared memory is almost universally a mistake. It only makes sense if (a) only a single process ever uses it - in which case it should be out of the shared memory, or (b) all processes map the shared memory at the exact same address in their address space. You need to get rid of m_pBuff and just use m_aBuff directly. –  Casey Jun 12 '13 at 22:01
    
You never check the return value of pop for failure. –  Casey Jun 12 '13 at 22:07
    
Thanks for pointing out to get rid of m_pBuff. m_aBuff works fine. –  user193272 Jun 12 '13 at 22:13
    
Yes, I do not check pop's return value in the example I provided. The code I provided was a working minimal example, extracted from a larger code and tailored primarily to ask this questions. In the actual code, all of those return values are checked. –  user193272 Jun 12 '13 at 22:15
    
When you say "There is one sole writer process that writes to that object in shared memory, and one sole reader (so no need to use synchronization)." what happens if the reader read at the exact same time as the writer writes for something that's not atomic? –  doctorlove Jun 12 '13 at 22:29

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