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I am totally confused about how I should go about "the rails way" of effectively using my associations.

Here is an example model configuration from a Rails 4 app:

class Film < ActiveRecord::Base
  # A movie, documentary, animated short, etc
  has_many :roleships
  has_many :participants, :through => :roleships
  has_many :roles, :through => :roleships
  # has_many :writers........ ?
end

class Participant < ActiveRecord::Base
  # A human involved in making a movie
  has_many :roleships
end

class Role < ActiveRecord::Base
  # A person's role in a film. i.e. "Writer", "Actor", "Extra" etc
  has_many :roleships
end

class Roleship < ActiveRecord::Base
  # The join for connecting different people
  # to the different roles they have had in
  # different films
  belongs_to :participant
  belongs_to :film
  belongs_to :role
end

Given the above model configuration, the code I wish I had would allow me to add writers directly to a film and in the end have the join setup correctly.

So for example, I'd love to be able to do something like this:

## The Code I WISH I Had
Film.create!(name: "Some film", writers: [Participant.first])

I'm not sure if I'm going about thinking about this totally wrong but it seems impossible. What is the right way to accomplish this? Nested resources? A custom setter + scope? Something else? Virtual attributes? thank you!

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2 Answers 2

I created a sample app based on your question. https://github.com/szines/hodor_filmdb

I think useful to setup in Participant and in Role model a through association as well, but without this will work. It depends how would you like to use later this database. Without through this query wouldn't work: Participant.find(1).films

class Participant < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :roleships
  has_many :films, through: :roleships
end

class Role < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :roleships
  has_many :films, through: :roleships
end

Don't forget to give permit for extra fields (strong_parameters) in your films_controller.rb

def film_params
  params.require(:film).permit(:title, :participant_ids, :role_ids)
end

What is strange, that if you create a new film with a participant and a role, two records will be created in the join table.

Hope this help, and someone could help us to improve further... if you have any question just let me know.

Update:

You can create a kind of virtual attribute in your model. For example:

def writers=(participant)
  @writer_role = Role.find(1)
  self.roles << @writer_role
  self.participants << participant
end

and you can use: Film.create(title: 'The Movie', writers: [Participant.first])

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for putting this into a real app & repo. I actually didn't put effort into the Participant and Role models because building them out is irrelevant to my question. Basically I'd like to know how i should setup my associations to support writing code similar to what i have under "The Code I WISH I Had" –  Hodor Jun 13 '13 at 7:56
    
Ok. I see. You can see an example for that in seed.rb. it is true that in my solution the role could be dynamic and not only writers. –  szines Jun 13 '13 at 8:22
    
Answer updated with a virtual attribute. –  szines Jun 13 '13 at 10:09

If you had a normal has_and_belongs_to_many relationship i.e. beween a film and a participant, then you can create a film together with your examples.

As your joining model is more complex, you have to build the roleships separately:

writer= Roleship.create(
          participant: Participant.find_by_name('Spielberg'),
          role: Role.find_by_name('Director')
        )
main_actor= Roleship.create(
          participant: Participant.find_by_name('Willis'),
          role: Role.find_by_name('Actor')
        )

Film.create!(name: "Some film", roleships: [writer, main_actor])

for that, all attributes you use to build roleships and films must be mass assignable, so in a Rails 3.2 you would have to write:

class Roleship < ActiveRecord::Base
   attr_accessible :participant, :role
   ...
end

class Film < ActiveRecord::Base
   attr_accessible :name, :roleships
   ...
end

If you want to user roleship_ids, you have to write

class Film < ActiveRecord::Base
   attr_accessible :name, :roleship_ids
   ...
end

Addendum:

Of cause you could write a setter method

class Film ...

  def writers=(part_ids)
     writer_role=Role.find_by_name('Writer')
     # skiped code to delete existing writers
     part_ids.each do |part_id|
        self.roleships << Roleship.new(role: writer_role, participant_id: part_id)
     end
  end
end

but that makes your code depending on the data in your DB (contents of table roles) which is a bad idea.

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Wouldn't this have adverse implications down the road? For example, if there were nested forms (ie building out a movie from a view), this would all have to be shoved into a fattened controller? Also, as i mentioned, this is a rails4 app (uses strong params) –  Hodor Jun 12 '13 at 23:36
    
You can push the creation of the roleships to the model, then you have to pass all nescessary parameters to that creation function. That way you can construct forms with some kind of "custom nested attributes" –  Martin M Jun 13 '13 at 7:06
    
I think I understand conceptually, but I'm not able to envision exactly what that code would look like. –  Hodor Jun 13 '13 at 19:55

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