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I want to draw two filled contours with alpha blending, and a colorbar to match resulting plot. For example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

arr = np.random.random((10, 10))

plt.contourf(arr, 10)
plt.contourf(arr, 10, cmap='coolwarm', levels=np.arange(0, 1, .2), alpha=.5)
plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

screenshot

draws colorbar for last contour.

I tried also this:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

arr = np.random.random((10, 10))

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

cax = ax.contourf(arr, 10)
cb = fig.colorbar(cax)

cax = ax.contourf(arr, 10, cmap='coolwarm', levels=np.arange(0, 1, .2), alpha=.5)
cb.update_bruteforce(cax)

plt.show()

which doesn't give me expected result:

screenshot

How to draw colorbar that matches actual plot in this example?

share|improve this question
    
So am i correct to assume you basically want a new colormap which for 2/3 is your default (jet?), and for 1/3 coolwarm? If you define how you want to add those up you can make a new colormap and use it in the colorbar. –  Rutger Kassies Jun 13 '13 at 6:22
    
Alpha is 0.5 not 0.33, but it doesn't really matter as it's just an example. Creating manually new colormap is bad idea. –  theta Jun 13 '13 at 7:02
    
If you use 1 colormap for the default 1.0 and the other for 0.5 you get 2/3 and 1/3. I dont understand why you want to use two colormaps in your plot, but dont want to combine them for the colorbar. Do you want two separate colorbars? –  Rutger Kassies Jun 13 '13 at 11:08
    
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying. If you think that making new colormap is good idea, please post it as answer. If it solves the problem, I'll accept it –  theta Jun 13 '13 at 20:55

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