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What I am trying to do: I have several struct types, all implementing the same interface, which declare a method, say "Process()"

type Worker interface {
  Process()
}

type obj1 struct {
}

func (o *obj1) Process() {
}

// same with struct type obj2, obj3, ...

Throughout the code, I create several instances of these structs, and then I want to call the process on each of these. Calling Process() on each works fine.

o1 := obj1.New()
o2 := obj1.New()
o3 := obj2.New()
o4 := obj3.New()
// ...
o1.Process()
o2.Process()
// ...

Now, I would like to have a "ProcessAll()" function, that would receive those instances and do the job of calling the Process() method on each of those, as well as some meta work around it.

Here is the sort of code that I'm trying to produce, but this particular snippet does not work because I'm not sure how to do it:

func ProcessAll(objs []*Worker) {
   for _, obj := range objs {
     obj.Process()
   }
}

ProcessAll([]*Worker{o1, o2, /* ... */})

Is that sort of things possible to accomplish with go, and if yes how can I do to implement it ?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You don't need to make objs array of pointers to interface. Interfaces are reference values.

package main

import "fmt"

type Worker interface{
    Process()
}

type obj1 struct {
}

func (o *obj1) Process() {
    fmt.Println("obj1 Process()")
}

type obj2 struct {
}

func (o *obj2) Process() {
    fmt.Println("obj2 Process()")
}

func ProcessAll(objs []Worker) {
    for _, o := range objs {
        o.Process()
    }
}

func main() {
    ProcessAll([]Worker{ &obj1{}, &obj2{} })
}

Or check it out here: http://play.golang.org/p/eWXiZzrN-W

share|improve this answer
    
and further to the point, when a type implements an interface, its pointer type does too – newacct Jun 13 '13 at 0:11

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