Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My code is supposed to simulate something similar to a vending machine. But there is a problem when I enter a price that is not one of my options, e.g. 0.82 the program still runs. How do I get it to only accept one of my options?

import java.util.Scanner;

public class VendingMachine 
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        double price;
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Choose your price. Your options are: ");
        double i;
        for (i=0.25; i<=1.25; i+=0.25)
             System.out.printf("$%.2f\n", i );

        System.out.println("Enter your selection now: ");
        price=keyboard.nextDouble();
        System.out.printf("You chose the $%.2f option. ",price);    
        double deposit;

        if (price<=1.00) {
            System.out.println("Please insert 1 dollar. *This machine only accepts Loonies*");
            deposit=1;
        } else {
            System.out.println("Please insert 2 dollars.*This machine only accepts Loonies*");
            deposit=2;
        }

        System.out.println("Please press 'Enter' to simulate inserting money. ");
        new Scanner(System.in).nextLine();

        double change;
        change = deposit-price;
        System.out.printf("Your change is $%.2f\n",change);
    }
}

I tried something like this but it doesn't work. What is the best way to do this.

if (price==i)
    System.out.println("You entered " + price);
else {
    System.out.println("Invalide choice. Please try again.")
    System.exit(0);
}

Here is an image if you find it easier to read.

share|improve this question
1  
"this doesn't work" is not informative enough. please post the full code, the input and expected output vs. real output –  alfasin Jun 12 '13 at 23:40
    
Have you tried to run it under debugger to see values of price and i just before your if? –  PM 77-1 Jun 12 '13 at 23:40
    
I think you should give options like 1 2 3 or A) B) C) rather than getting the value. Then use a switch statement to get the default if the given value isn't correct. –  giannis christofakis Jun 12 '13 at 23:41
    
Sorry I forgot to point out that I am aware I can run else if statements on my 5 options quite easily. But if there were way more options than 5, how could I do it with out repeating else if a whole bunch of times? Or is that the best way?? Thanks again. –  user2348639 Jun 12 '13 at 23:43
    
alfasin the program runs with out error but no matter what I put as input it tells me invalid selection. If you click on the image link you can see my input and output very clearly –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 0:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want the user to enter only your displayed prices, I suggest the following, you shall edit to your exact desires.

    //given you an open scanner
    boolean isCorrectPrice = false;

    System.out.println("enter price");
    price = in.nextDouble();
    while(!isCorrectPrice)
    {
       if(price%0.25==0 && price<=1.25 && price>0)
       {
          System.out.println("you entered "+price);
          IsCorrectPrice = true;
          continue;
       }
       System.out.println("incorrect price, re-enter ");
       price = in.nextDouble();
    }
   //your code after user enters correct price

That will do the check. If your prices change, all you have to do is change the maximum price provided its still dividable with 0.25 or the condition price check.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey this works great! I wish I had tried it sooner. I was just trying to go through and understand all of the other posts first. This is my favorite one. Thanks! –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 3:02

You can use some sort of loop (while, do-while, for), which will continue to excecute the code until a condition is (or isn't) met.

Here is an example:

do {
   code line 1;
   code line 2;
   code line 3;
   ...
} while(yourCondition);

If yourCondition is satisfied (yourCondition == true), the code will go back to code line 1 (will perform the code block between do and while) and it'll stop once the condition isn't satisfied(yourCondition == false). yourCondition could be any expression that returns a true/false result (boolean), such as 2+2==4.

If you want to keep looping for as long as yourCondition isn't met, you can add a ! before your expression, which will evaluate the opposite of your boolean like this (!yourCondition).

Now, if you understood how that works, you can easily apply it to your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow I wasn't expecting so many answers so quickly. Thanks guys! I try this: do { System.out.println("Enter your selection: "); price=keyboard.nextDouble(); } while (price != i) But it just repeats Enter your selection now no matter what my input is. –  user2348639 Jun 12 '13 at 23:55
    
then either i or price don't have the value you suspect. Using the debugger you can check whats wrong (or you can just print the value of i and price right before the while –  Mr D Jun 13 '13 at 0:04
    
Outside of my for statement, i is equal to 1.75... But I don't really understand why. I tried putting my do-while inside of my for statement, and I've tried putting my for statement inside of my do-while statement, but I keep getting a ton of errors. How do I make i equal all of my options? –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 1:04
    
A better way to word my question maybe, is how do I extend what is in my for loop through out my entire program? –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 1:10
    
Sorry I keep re-posting on here, but for example, if I put: for (i=0.25; i<=2; i+=0.25) System.out.printf("$%.2f\n", i ); System.out.println(i); The 'i' outside of my for will equal 2.25. (It always equals .25 more than the max value in my for statement) Why? –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 1:22

Use BigDecimal (instead of double) to work with money. Its exact -- double isn't. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/math/BigDecimal.html

I would write a function to get the user input. It would not return until the user had entered an allowed value.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice! I didn't know about this yet. –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 0:04

Although my real answer is the one on the comments, you can use something like this. To check recursively if the correct value was given.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class VendingMachine {

    static Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Choose your price. Your options are: ");
        for (double i = 0.25; i <= 1.25; i += 0.25) {
            System.out.printf("$%.2f\n", i);
        }

        double price = checkMultipleValues(0.25,1.25, 0.25);

        System.out.printf("You chose the $%.2f option. ", price);

        double deposit;
        if (price <= 1.00) {
            System.out.println("Please insert 1 dollar. *This machine only accepts Loonies*");
            deposit = 1;
        } else {
            System.out.println("Please insert 2 dollars.*This machine only accepts Loonies*");
            deposit = 2;
        }

        System.out.println("Please press 'Enter' to simulate inserting money. ");
        new Scanner(System.in).nextLine();

        double change;
        change = deposit - price;
        System.out.printf("Your change is $%.2f\n", change);
    }

    private static double checkMultipleValues(double initial,double last,double step) {

        System.out.println("Enter your selection now: ");
        double price = keyboard.nextDouble();

        for (double i = initial; i <= last; i += step) {
            if (price == i) {
                return price;
            }
        }

        return checkMultipleValues( initial, last, step);
    }
}


ADDENDUM


Since you like @Sello answer why don't you combine it with @MrD and have something like

do {
    System.out.println("enter price");
    price = in.nextDouble();
//    System.out.println("you entered " + price);
} while (!(price % 0.25 == 0 && price <= 1.25 && price > 0));
share|improve this answer
    
Hi yannis. I hope you don't think I've been ignoring you. I've just been trying to juggle all these new concepts and understand what everyone is trying to tell me. I am going to try the program again afterwards, if I can get this one to work, and I'll try using the switch statement. I have read about it in my book but haven't tried it yet. Thanks for all the great advice! –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 0:50
    
Hey it took me a while but I finally got around to going over this code. It works perfectly. I didn't do it right away because I didn't recognize some things and to be honest it looked kind of overwhelming. I am going to do some reading tonight and try and master what you put down here. Thanks again for the help –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 1:28
    
I've been trying to upvote everyone that helped but my rep is too low. I just started this account. Sorry. –  user2348639 Jun 13 '13 at 2:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.