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So, suppose I have the following constructor function, whose prototype I have modified like so:

function foo(options) {
  this.propA_ = 'whatever';
  this.propB_ = 'something';
  this.propC_ = options.stuff;
  this.randomMethod = function omg() {
    /*code etc etc etc*/
  }
}

foo.prototype.p1 = 1;
foo.prototype.p2 = 2;

After I have made foo, I want to create a new constructor, bar(), that is like a sort super foo: it has all of the properties, prototpye info, and methods of foo, but it ALSO has some extra properties and methods sprinkled on top. Would the following code be the most elegant way to do this?

function foo(options) {
  this.propA_ = 'whatever';
  this.propB_ = 'something';
  this.propC_ = options.stuff;
  this.randomMethod = function omg() {
    /*code etc etc etc*/
  }
}

foo.prototype.p1 = 1;
foo.prototype.p2 = 2;

function bar(options) {
  this = foo(options);
  this.propD_ = 'yet another thing';
  this.propE_ = options.moreStuff;
}

bar.prototype.p3 = 3;
foo.prototype.testing = 'A test';

smallObj = foo()'
bigObj = bar();

After running that code, here is what I would expect to get

console.log(a.p3); //3

bigObj.p2 = 100;
console.log(bigObj.p2); //100
console.log(foo.prototype.p2); //2

console.log(bigObj.randomMethod()); //Will work
console.log(smallObj.p3); //undefined
console.log(smallObj.propA_); //'whatever'
console.log(bigObj.propA_); //'whatever'

foo.prototype.propA_ = 'something totally different'
console.log(bigObj.propA_); //'something totally different'

Is this a correct way of "extending" the functionality of some existing constructor, to make a sort of "Foo Plus". Basically, I'd like for foo to continue to work exactly as it did before bar() came into existence, but for bar to be a set of properties and methods that are added on top of foo. Am I doing this right?

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Is it correct? No. Run it. This will fail. this = foo(options); Seems like you're just guessing at it. There's lots of information about inheritance online for you to study. –  Crazy Train Jun 12 '13 at 23:44
    
Yes, I know that my understanding is poor. I have studied several threads on here and I am still not very clear on what is going on. I'm trying to rationalize my own example. And yes, I know it fails, my question is why. –  AlexZ Jun 12 '13 at 23:48
    
Ok, so I made some changes to your fiddle: jsfiddle.net/8QCE2 I can sort wrap my head around why this = new foo(opts); is wrong: this refers to the object constructed by bar(), and obviously I can't just redefine that object all willy-nilly; I can set its properties and I can add methods and what not, but I can't just redefine it. What I would like to do is get the "this" in bar() to inherit the prototype of foo.... –  AlexZ Jun 13 '13 at 0:15
    
Okay, so I almost have it. Link to the latest fiddle: jsfiddle.net/kZTe2 So basically the prototype is copying over just fine, so I think I have that right. Further, changes the prototype of foo is reflected in the prototype of bar, which is also great. My problem is that properties constructed within foo() itself are not being transferred to bar(). Line 45 in my fiddle is not producing the results it should. Why is this? How do I get properties set inside the constructor to transfer over to a new object that is inheriting it? –  AlexZ Jun 13 '13 at 0:15
    
It's better to declare your method properties with prototype as they don't change per instance but value properties that do you can declate with this.something="my instance value". A simple explanation with sample code about prototype and this behavior is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/16063394/… You can press F12 in chrome, run the code in the console and play with it to better understand it. –  HMR Jun 13 '13 at 0:24
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure why you have so much code to have prototype inheritance. You can use something like goog.inherit (and goog.base if you plan to use closure compiler to compile) from the closure library.

Here is some sample code that uses goog.inherit:

var goog = {};
/**
 * Inherit the prototype methods from one constructor into another.
 * @param {Function} childCtor Child class.
 * @param {Function} parentCtor Parent class.
 */
goog.inherits = function (childCtor, parentCtor) {
    /** @constructor */
    function tempCtor() { };
    tempCtor.prototype = parentCtor.prototype;
    childCtor.superClass_ = parentCtor.prototype;
    childCtor.prototype = new tempCtor();
    childCtor.prototype.constructor = childCtor;
};
/** @constructor */
var GrandParent = function (arg1) {
    window['console'].log("grandparent constructor called with arg1:", arg1);
}
GrandParent.prototype.doSomething = function () {
    return "From GrandParent";
}
/** @constructor */
var Parent = function (arg1, arg2) {
    GrandParent.call(this, arg1);
    window['console'].log("parent constructor called with arg1:", arg1);
    window['console'].log("parent constructor called with arg2:", arg2);
}
goog.inherits(Parent, GrandParent);
/** @override */
Parent.prototype.doSomething = function () {
    return Parent.superClass_.doSomething() + " From Parent";
}
/** @constructor 
* @extends Parent */
var Child = function (arg1, arg2, arg3) {
    Parent.call(this, arg1, arg2);
    window['console'].log("child constructor called with arg1:", arg1);
    window['console'].log("child constructor called with arg2:", arg2);
    window['console'].log("child constructor called with arg3:", arg3);
}
goog.inherits(Child, Parent);
/** @override */
Child.prototype.doSomething = function () {
    return Child.superClass_.doSomething() + " From Child";
}

var c = new Child("arg1", "arg2", "arg3");
console.log(c.doSomething());
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Ok, I finally worked through the discussion I have in the comment thread in response to the quesion, and this is the answer I came up with. I'll repost the code here - thank you to everyone who helped me work through this!

function foo(options) {
    this.propA_ = 'whatever';
    this.propB_ = 'something';
    this.propC_ = options.stuff;
    this.randomMethod = function omg() {
        /*code etc etc etc*/
    };
}
foo.prototype.p1 = 1;
foo.prototype.p2 = 2;

function bar(options) {
    //this = new foo(options);
    var parent = new foo(options);
    this.prototype = parent.prototype;

    for (var x in parent) {
        if (parent.hasOwnProperty(x)) {
            console.log('iterating past'+x);
            this[x] = parent[x];
        }
    }

    this.propD_ = 'yet another thing';
    this.propE_ = options.moreStuff;
}
// Make `bar` inherit from an instance of `foo`
bar.prototype = Object.create(foo.prototype);

// Add properties to the bar prototype
bar.prototype.p3 = 3;

// Not sure what you were doing here
//foo.prototype.testing = 'A test';

var myOpts = {
    stuff: 'a cat',
    moreStuff: 'many dogs'
};

var smallObj = new foo(myOpts);
var bigObj = new bar(myOpts);


console.log(smallObj.p2); //2

console.log(bigObj.p2); //2
bigObj.p2 = 100;
console.log(bigObj.p2); //100
console.log(foo.prototype.p2); //2

//console.log(bigObj.randomMethod()); //Will work
console.log(smallObj.p3); //undefined
console.log(smallObj.propA_); //'whatever'
console.log(bigObj.propA_); //'whatever'

foo.prototype.propA_ = 'something totally different';
console.log(bigObj.propA_); //'whatever'
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