Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

An thoughts on how to condense this query?

select [gp1].[sID] 
from
( 
   select [ftsIndexWordOnce].[sID], [ftsIndexWordOnce].[wordID]
     from [ftsIndexWordOnce] with (nolock)
     Join [FTSindex] with (nolock) 
       On [FTSindex].[sID] = [ftsIndexWordOnce].[sID] 
      And [FTSindex].[wordID] = [ftsIndexWordOnce].[wordID] 
      And [FTSindex].[wordPOS] <= '1000' 
     join [FTSwordDef] with (nolock) 
       on [ftsIndexWordOnce].[wordID] = [FTSwordDef].[ID] 
      and [FTSwordDef].[word] in ('capital','bank')   
    group by [ftsIndexWordOnce].[sID], [ftsIndexWordOnce].[wordID]
)   [gp1] 
group by [gp1].[sID] 
having count(*) = 2

PK [ftsIndexWordOnce] is [sID], [wordID]
PK [FTSindex] is [sID], [wordPos]

Below is not part of the question.
It is just background.

The base query is

select [ftsIndexWordOnce].[sID] 
 from [ftsIndexWordOnce] with (nolock)
 join [FTSwordDef] with (nolock) 
   on [ftsIndexWordOnce].[wordID] = [FTSwordDef].[ID] 
  and [FTSwordDef].[word] in ('capital','bank')
group by [ftsIndexWordOnce].[sID]
having count(*) = 2 
order by [ftsIndexWordOnce].[sID]

This finds document with both the words.
The question query extends this to both those words in the 1000 words.

share|improve this question
    
If you're going to do WITH (NOLOCK) (and yes, I come down on the "don't do this" side of the debate) then you may as well just issue SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED and be done with it. It's a mess to put it on every table!! – ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 1:58
    
@ErikE How can you have a debate on the use of (nolock) when you know nothing about how the application is used. – Paparazzi Jun 13 '13 at 2:26
    
Because it can return data that never existed, not just uncommitted data. It can also cause queries to exclude rows that are already committed when using indexed views, as proven in the wild (sorry, I can't find the recent question on SO where a poster showed this was happening). Systems that require uncommitted reads to avoid deadlocks or long blocks are in my (perhaps wrong) opinion in dire need of redesign or index overhauling. – ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 2:43
    
@ErikE Again you know nothing about this app. Really a (nolock) can return data the never exited? Just how do you return data that never existed? I don't want to take read lock to not slow down inserts. This data is never mutated. – Paparazzi Jun 13 '13 at 3:03
    
I'm sorry to have stepped on your toes about NOLOCK. It is clearly an area you feel strongly about. I was trying to help by giving a way to clean up the queries by not having to write the table hint over and over--my "don't do this" comment was just an aside, meant mildly. About "never existed", I didn't make up that term, there are resources on the web that suggest this for dirty reads. In any case, I'm glad you are well versed on the pitfalls of dirty reads and know that your application is benefited by them. – ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 3:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the most important issue is that you need indexes in both FTSindex and ftsIndexWordOnce on the wordID column. You didn't say if there are nonclustered indexes on these tables that have wordID as the first column--but even if they have such indexes, How often are individual words looked up from a known sID? It seems more likely to me that you are starting from particular known words and trying to find sIDs from them. If my guess is right, then your PKs should change to put wordID first. sID can be the first column in a nonclustered index so that targeted queries based on sID can still use two separate seeks (once to the nonclustered, then to the clustered).

Once those indexes are in place, we can address the next thing: it seems like you're joining to ftsIndexWordOnce because it only indexes each word per sID once, but then since that table doesn't have a firstWordPOS column, you also have to join to FTSindex to make sure each word appears in the first 1000-- so this pretty much loses the entire benefit of using ftsIndexWordOnce. Right now, since my guess is that you would have to do a table scan on either one, ftsIndexWordOnce still gives you some benefit because it is a smaller table and thus takes fewer reads to scan. Once you address the index problems above, suddenly ftsIndexWordOnce is needlessly costing more, and you can eliminate ftsIndexWordOnce from the query by using Count(DISTINCT):

SELECT
   i.sID
FROM
   dbo.FTSindex i
   INNER JOIN dbo.FTSwordDef w
      ON i.wordID = w.ID
WHERE
   i.wordPOS <= 1000
   AND w.word in ('capital','bank')   
GROUP BY
   i.sID
HAVING
   Count(DISTINCT i.wordID) = 2
;

Another idea is that you could add a firstWordPOS column to the ftsIndexWordOnce, and modify whatever process you already use to build it in the first place to update that as well (and then populate it). This would allow you to go back to your original query and simply add the condition AND firstWordPOS <= 1000. With the smaller size of the ftsIndexWordOnce table and its new clustered index starting with wordID, performance will be further improved.

Here is another crazy idea that might give you some benefit if you do add an index on wordID but don't make it the first column of the clustered indexes:

SELECT W1.sID
FROM
   (
      SELECT DISTINCT i.sID
      FROM
         dbo.FTSindex i
         INNER JOIN dbo.FTSwordDef w
            ON i.wordID = w.ID
      WHERE
         i.wordPOS <= 1000 
         AND w.word = 'capital'
    ) W1 INNER JOIN (
      SELECT DISTINCT i.sID
      FROM
         dbo.FTSindex i
         INNER JOIN dbo.FTSwordDef w
            ON i.wordID = w.ID
      WHERE
         i.wordPOS <= 1000 
         AND w.word = 'bank'
     ) W2 ON W1.sID = W2.sID
;

This has the drawback of not being easily modified to accommodate more words, but may switch certain queries to range seeks from scans--sometimes OR or IN can trigger a scan, where if the number of items is small, separate queries will get seeks.

Last, since wordPOS is obviously numeric, please do not put it in quotes as a string in your query: wordPOS <= 1000 is better.

P.S. Just to be clear, changing the PKs is not required. As you said, doing so might be catastrophic to the nightly load process. But you did indicate there are other indexes, so if you have one on WordID in those tables then perhaps you are already well served.

May I suggest humbly (since I don't know your system like you do) that if your loads mostly insert new data without changing a lot of existing data, then your system may reach a tipping point where reloading the entire set of data is slower than putting in the changes. You could even consider using a staging table that is ordered by sID, and from which only strategic updates are made to the final table--and if you were to do that, then changing the PK of the final table could become an option. Just a (possibly ignorant) thought.

share|improve this answer
    
Changing the PK is NOT an option. When I load to that table I need to load as fast as possible and the data loads that order. I drop other indexes, load, and then rebuild other indexes. It is a massive table that loads at night. As for no value in [ftsIndexWordOnce] - did you look at the "base query"? The first query gives the right answer and I have not yet tested the second. It gets built up into a larger query and the query optimizer can (easily) get stupid. – Paparazzi Jun 13 '13 at 2:48
    
I don't understand what you mean by "no value in ftsIndexWordOnce". I did look at your base query. I see that you modified it to try to ensure the words appear in the first 1000 words. Since you do have additional indexes, did you try either of my queries as is? – ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 2:55
    
Get it, my mistake. Your first query does not use ftsIndexWordOnce. This is a massive table that does not mutate. May truncate and recreate the table but it never mutates. And I said the first gives the right answer. – Paparazzi Jun 13 '13 at 3:00
    
@Blam Oh, I wasn't sure if you meant your first query or my first query. – ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 3:05
    
Went with the first. And I don't reload all data. – Paparazzi Jun 13 '13 at 12:07

Try this, it might work:

 select Distinct o.sID
 from ftsIndexWordOnce o with (nolock)
    Join FTSindex i with (nolock) 
       On i.sID = o.sID 
          And i.wordID = o.wordID 
          And i.wordPOS <= '1000' 
    join FTSwordDef w with (nolock) 
       on w.ID = o.wordID
          and w.word in ('capital','bank')   
 group by o.sID
 Having Count(*) = 2
share|improve this answer
    
Good thought and worth a try but returns more records. If capital alone occurred twice then it get included. – Paparazzi Jun 13 '13 at 2:33
    
Distinct o.sID ... group by o.SID is redundant... – ErikE Jun 13 '13 at 2:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.