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Instead of declaring each function as "static" in a class, is there any way that I can make a class itself "static"?

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closed as too localized by tereško, PeeHaa, Bhavik Ambani, shiplu.mokadd.im, Ed Heal Dec 25 '12 at 5:29

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1  
what are you trying to accomplish with a "static" class? –  dnagirl Nov 10 '09 at 13:04
    
What's the difference between a static class and a module/file filled with the functions? –  workmad3 Nov 10 '09 at 13:11
    
@dnagirl: I want to call it's functions without adding "require...". The methods in the class must be directly accessible. –  RKh Nov 10 '09 at 13:11
    
@workmad3: An ordinary class can contain static as well as non-static methods, whereas, I want a way to make all methods as static, by default. –  RKh Nov 10 '09 at 13:13
    
@workmad3 - it gives you pseudo namespace support (which given the kludge that PHP namespaces have turned out to be, may be just as good as the proper thing) –  iAn Nov 10 '09 at 13:14
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd say the best way to go is to prevent object instantiation through a private constructor and explicitly marking all methods as static. Although you have to be careful to mark all methods as static (which is the result of static classes not existing in PHP), the benefit of this method over the Singleton approach is that static methods are more efficient than their non-static counterparts. You probably also want your class marked as final, as most static classes are not designed to be extended anyway (and it is good practice to do so).

An example would be something like this:

final class PseudoStatic {

  /**
   * Prevent object instantiation
   */
  private function __construct() {}

  static public function method1() {
    ...
  }

  static public function method2() {
    ...
  }

  ...
}

Furthermore, the Singleton pattern is now considered a bad practice by some.

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Not in PHP - you must mark every member as static that you wish to be static. For for information please see the PHP manual.

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There is nothing comparable to the (for ex.) Java static classes way. If you just want to collect function in a kind of library, you can set the __construct() and the __clone() methods to private. This will prevent the creation of instances.

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You can have a look to this page but I don't think you can declare the entire class as static.

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@mnml: Already seen that page before posting. Thanks anyway. –  RKh Nov 10 '09 at 13:13
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Or if what you really want to achieve is to only have one class instance, then make the constructor private and provide with a static instance() method. For example:

class PseudoStatic {

  static private $instance;

  private function __construct() {}

  static public function instance() {
    if (!self::$instance) {
      self$instance = new self;
    }
    return self::$instance;
  }

}

$instance = new PseudoStatic(); // error!
$instance = PseudoStatic::instance(); // force one instance only
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2  
This more a singleton like pattern and has nothing to do with static classes ... –  Mario Mueller Nov 10 '09 at 13:14
4  
This is the Singleton pattern, which is not the same as Static –  iAn Nov 10 '09 at 13:15
    
well, i'm suggesting a workaround since static class has not really existed yet in php5. maybe php6 or php7? for me, as long as a suggestion solve the problem, it doesn't really have to answer the question ;) –  Lukman Nov 10 '09 at 13:17
    
PHP won't need static classes, but this a question for the evangelists ;) –  Mario Mueller Nov 10 '09 at 13:17
1  
I believe Mario is suggesting referencing members of the static class as StaticClassName::StaticMethodName(); –  Cory House Nov 10 '09 at 13:28
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