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I thought I could create and populate a C++ map like this:

 39 int main(){
 40 
 41   cout << "Approximate travelling salesman path finder." << endl;
 42   cout << "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~" << endl << endl;
 43 
 44   map<City, OtherCities> database; 
 45   ReadInData(&database);
 46   ... 
 47 }

As a side note, the ReadInData function just takes a map<City, OtherCities> reference as an argument, where City is just a typedef of string (the name of a city), and OtherCities is a priority queue containing (string, int) pairs that represent other cities and their distances from the first one.

Anyway, attempting to compile this leads to the following error:

pr3.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
pr3.cpp:45: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type ‘std::map<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::priority_queue<OtherCity, std::vector<OtherCity, std::allocator<OtherCity> >, std::greater<OtherCity> >, std::less<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::allocator<std::pair<const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::priority_queue<OtherCity, std::vector<OtherCity, std::allocator<OtherCity> >, std::greater<OtherCity> > > > >&’ from a temporary of type ‘std::map<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::priority_queue<OtherCity, std::vector<OtherCity, std::allocator<OtherCity> >, std::greater<OtherCity> >, std::less<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::allocator<std::pair<const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::priority_queue<OtherCity, std::vector<OtherCity, std::allocator<OtherCity> >, std::greater<OtherCity> > > > >*’

What am I doing wrong here, and (besides using a taboo global variable), is there another nice way to keep the the database in the main function and populate/use it elsewhere? I didn't want to just pass a copy of it by value...

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marked as duplicate by jogojapan, nvoigt, RDC, Soner Gönül, Hiren Jun 13 '13 at 6:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
database is not an uninitialized variable. Assuming map refers to std::map, which has a default constructor, database is default constructed. – K-ballo Jun 13 '13 at 4:13
    
@K-ballo: Edited. Thanks for pointing that out! :-) – nicole Jun 13 '13 at 4:16
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the function takes a reference, you should pass database, not &database The latter is the address of database, so it's a pointer, not a reference.

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OHH...Oops. You're getting the best answer check mark in ~8 minutes when I can give it...ha ha. – nicole Jun 13 '13 at 4:13

Like what you said, ReadInData() is like this:

ReadInData(map<City, OtherCities>& param)
//                               ^
//                            NOTICE THIS

It takes param by reference. Thus, you should do:

map<City, OtherCities> database; 
ReadInData(database);
//         ^
//      BYE-BYE &

and not ReadInData(&database); because with that, you are actually passing the address of database to ReadInData(), which is not what ReadInData() needs.

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