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current array is like

(a, b, c),

need to change their order, like(b,c,a),and (c,a,b),then add them to a new array, final goal is to get an array like

(( a, b, c,), (b, c, a), (c, a, b)) 

codes as following:

NSMutableArray * now = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"a", @"b", @"c", nil];
NSMutableArray * new = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
[new addObject:now];
NSLog(@"...new0: %@", new);

int n, i;
for (n = 0; n < 2; n ++) {
    for (i = 0; i < [now count] - 1; i ++) {
        [now exchangeObjectAtIndex:i withObjectAtIndex:i+1];
    }
    [new addObject:now];
}
NSLog(@"...new1: %@", new);

BUT, the final new1 result is (c,a,b)overwrote previous ones! What's wrong with my codes?

...new1: (
    (
    c,
    a,
    b
),
    (
    c,
    a,
    b
),
    (
    c,
    a,
    b
)

)

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1 Answer

the problem was that you were using the same array now to make the changes. this results in changing the previous value of now stored in new. this can be solved by adding a copy of now as shown below

NSMutableArray * now = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"a", @"b", @"c", nil];
    NSMutableArray * new = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    [new addObject:[now copy]];
    NSLog(@"...new0: %@", new);

    int n, i;
    for (n = 0; n < 2; n ++) {
        for (i = 0; i < [now count] - 1; i ++) {
            [now exchangeObjectAtIndex:i withObjectAtIndex:i+1];
        }
        [new addObject:[now copy]];
    }
    NSLog(@"...new1: %@", new);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot! a guy gave me a tip, which very similar to your revision, [new addObject:[NSArray arrayWithArray:now]]; what's the difference between these two? –  iOS.dev Jun 14 '13 at 9:47
    
Both are doing the same, instead of adding a reference to the array being added, it adds a copy of the array that holds no reference. I think my answer would be better since it gives you an idea of what is going on. By the way if you found the answer helpful, a tick for the answer would be much appreciated.. –  Ajithmn89 Jun 17 '13 at 4:39
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