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How can I handle an HTTP error, e.g. 500, when using the AngularJS "http get then" construct (promises)?

$http.get(url).then(
    function(response) {
        console.log('get',response)
    }
)

Problem is, for any non 200 HTTP response, the inner function is not called.

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up vote 88 down vote accepted

You need to add an additional parameter:

$http.get(url).then(
    function(response) {
        console.log('get',response)
    },
    function(data) {
        // Handle error here
    })
share|improve this answer
4  
Note also that 'response' object above has: data, status, headers, config, statusText. The 'data' object above has: data, status, config, statusText. (There are special rules about whether statusText is passed - browsers, mobile or not, web server etc.) – OzBob Apr 13 '15 at 4:43

http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$http

$http.get(url).success(successCallback).error(errorCallback);

Replace successCallback and errorCallback with your functions.

Edit: Laurent's answer is more correct considering he is using then. Yet I'm leaving this here as an alternative for the folks who will visit this question.

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8  
It is worth mentioning that this does not do the same thing as Laurent's answer. .then() returns a promise. .success() and .error() do not. – James Brewer Nov 11 '14 at 11:11
2  
@james-brewer: To be more accurate, .then() returns a new promise. .success() and .error() do not, they both return the original promise provided by get(url). – dod Jan 19 '15 at 14:59
5  
It's important also to keep in mind that success and error callbacks for $http api will be deprecated. – Cristian Rojas Oct 8 '15 at 3:03

You can make this bit more cleaner by using:

$http.get(url)
    .then(function (response) {
        console.log('get',response)
    })
    .catch(function (data) {
        // Handle error here
    });

Similar to @this.lau_ answer, different approach.

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If you want to handle server errors globally, you may want to register an interceptor service for $httpProvider:

$httpProvider.interceptors.push(function ($q) {
    return {
        'responseError': function (rejection) {
            // do something on error
            if (canRecover(rejection)) {
                return responseOrNewPromise
            }
            return $q.reject(rejection);
        }
    };
});

Docs: http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$http

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I think you have made a mistake there. To handle response errors you need to create a response interceptor not a request interceptor as you have done. – djd Aug 7 '13 at 19:12
    
The interceptor for angular is both request and response as of 1.1.x. – mlaccetti Oct 15 '13 at 3:45

Try this

function sendRequest(method, url, payload, done){

        var datatype = (method === "JSONP")? "jsonp" : "json";
        $http({
                method: method,
                url: url,
                dataType: datatype,
                data: payload || {},
                cache: true,
                timeout: 1000 * 60 * 10
        }).then(
            function(res){
                done(null, res.data); // server response
            },
            function(res){
                responseHandler(res, done);
            }
        );

    }
    function responseHandler(res, done){
        switch(res.status){
            default: done(res.status + ": " + res.statusText);
        }
    }
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