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I have the following generic method, but VS gives me a compile error on that. (Operator '??' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T')

public static T Method<T>(T model) where T : new()
{
    var m = model ?? new T();
}

Does some one have any idea why?

Edit: Is it possible the reason is that T can be a struct in my case, and a struct is an non-nullable type?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 48 down vote accepted

You should add class constraint:

public static T Method<T>(T model) where T : class, new()
{
    var m = model ?? new T();

    return m;
}

And you should return m too!

Note: As @KristofDegrave mentioned in his comment, the reason that we have to add class constraint is because T can be a value type, like int and since ?? operator (null-coalescing) check on types that can be null, so we have to add class constraint to exclude value types.

Edit: Alvin Wong's answer covered the case for nullable types too; which are structs actually, but can be operands of ?? operator. Just be aware that Method would return null without Alvin's overloaded version, for nullable types.

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2  
Of-course they are the same! But in the question the 1st one is used. It's just that I've mentioned. –  Kaveh Shahbazian Jun 13 '13 at 6:34
3  
Is it possible the reason is that T can be a struct in my case, and a struct is an non-nullable type? –  Kristof Degrave Jun 13 '13 at 6:35
4  
@KristofDegrave You are right. That's why we have to explicitly add class constraint here. –  Kaveh Shahbazian Jun 13 '13 at 7:08
3  
I would like to give them both, but that isn't possible. Both give an answer to my question, but this is the only answer where my comment got an answer that is why –  Kristof Degrave Jun 13 '13 at 7:44
1  
I would thing the following: public static T? Method<T>(T? model) where T : struct { return model ?? default(T?); } –  Kristof Degrave Jun 20 '13 at 6:03

?? is the null-coalescing operator. It can't be applied to non-nullable types. Since T can be anything, it can be an int or other primitive, non-nullable type.

If you add the condition where T : class (must be specified before new()) it forces T to be a class instance, which is nullable.

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Doesn't the new() condition force T to be a nullable type? –  Kristof Degrave Jun 13 '13 at 6:29
3  
@KristofDegrave no new() only means there will be an empty construtor –  WiiMaxx Jun 13 '13 at 6:33
    
Is it possible the reason is that T can be a struct in my case, and a struct is an non-nullable type? –  Kristof Degrave Jun 13 '13 at 6:40
2  
+1 complete answer sad it is not the one with the tick –  V4Vendetta Jun 13 '13 at 11:28

Many have pointed out already that adding the class constraint for the generic will solve the problem.

If you want your method to be applicable to Nullable<T> too, you can add an overload for it:

// For reference types
public static T Method<T>(T model) where T : class, new()
{
    return model ?? new T();
}

// For Nullable<T>
public static T Method<T>(T? model) where T : struct
{
    return model ?? new T(); // OR
    return model ?? default(T);
}
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Tnx for pointing that out, but I don't need to support it for struct values :) –  Kristof Degrave Jun 13 '13 at 10:23
8  
@KristofDegrave Just pointing out for completeness. Someone else may need it! :) –  Alvin Wong Jun 13 '13 at 10:28

You need to specify that your T type is a class with a constraint on the generic type:

public static T Method<T>(T model) where T : class, new()
{
    return model ?? new T();
}
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Since T can be any type, there is no guarantee that T will have a static ?? operator or that the type T is nullable.

?? Operator (C# Reference)

The ?? operator is called the null-coalescing operator and is used to define a default value for nullable value types or reference types.

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For some reason the ?? operator can't be used on non-nullable types, even though it is supposed to be equivalent to model == null ? new T() : model, and you are allowed a null comparison with a non-nullable type.

You can get exactly what you're looking for without any additional constraints by using the ternary operator instead, or an if statement:

public static T Method<T>(T model) where T : new()
{
   var m = model == null ? new T() : model;
}
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This fails to handle Nullable<> types. It returns null when model is null. –  Alvin Wong Jun 13 '13 at 9:07
    
@AlvinWong Well, var m = new int?() is supposed to be null. For value types, new T() is similar to (if not exactly the same as) default(T). If you want to initialize nullable types to something other than the result of the default constructor, then this code is inadequate, but that was not the OP's question. –  Sahuagin Jun 13 '13 at 22:26

model ?? new T() means model == null ? new T() : model. It is not guaranteed that model is non-nullable and == cannot be applied for null and a non-nullable object. Changing constraint to where T : class, new() should work.

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Mark T as "class" and you are good to go.

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