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When I run the following:

import subprocess
subprocess.check_call('dir', shell=True)

The result always shows me the contents of C:\, no matter what directory I started the Python interpreter in. I even tried this:

import subprocess
subprocess.check_call('dir', shell=True, cwd='C:\\foo\\bar\\baz')

and that doesn't work either. I'm also having trouble building an application using Scons (Python-based build tool), for what appears to be the same reason:

scons: Building targets ...
cl /Fobuild\Animation.obj /c src\Animation.cpp /TP /DSFML_STATIC /EHsc /MD /Zi /Ideps/Box2D_v2.2.1 / Ideps/LuaJIT-2.0.2/src /Ideps/SFML-2.0/include /Ideps/include /nologo
Animation.cpp
c1xx : fatal error C1083: Cannot open source file: 'src\Animation.cpp': No such file or directory
scons: * [build\Animation.obj] Error 2
scons: building terminated because of errors.

Note that src\Animation.cpp actually does exist. I assume this happens b/c cl.exe is running from C:\ instead of the actual location where the Python interpreter is running from.

I thought this might be a problem with my environment variables, but I checked them and everything seems OK. I also removed/reinstalled Python, to no avail.

What's going on here?

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What's the output of print(os.getcwd())? –  Perkins Jun 13 '13 at 7:04
    
Also try it without shell=True. It can have odd behaviour when running a shell and you generally don't need it. –  Perkins Jun 13 '13 at 7:07
    
drop unnecessary () around arguments. –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 16 '13 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

You should escape '\' or use raw string (r'....').

>>> 'C:\foo\bar\baz'
'C:\x0coo\x08ar\x08az'
>>> r'C:\foo\bar\baz'
'C:\\foo\\bar\\baz'
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Or alternatively use / as a directory separator. –  cdarke Jun 13 '13 at 6:50
    
Transcription error. In my code I actually do escape the reverse slash. –  Matt Fichman Jun 13 '13 at 13:13
    
What is the output of import os; print(os.getcwd()) –  falsetru Jun 13 '13 at 13:25
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Fixed it! Problem was the AutoRun setting in the registry...not sure how that got set, but it was. To resolve this, go to:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Command Processor

In the registry, and delete the AutoRun setting. My AutoRun looked like this:

cd C:\

Which was completely screwing everything up.

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