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After some search, I did not find a proper way to center a list of <li> into a fixed width div... any solution there ?

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take a look at the page.. dont work !

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1  
Please post the code of what you've tried and describe or show how it's not working. –  Lazarus Nov 10 '09 at 13:48
    
Although you did describe your problem, it is greatly appreciated to be able to see some code. Consider adding some code so that your question will have a much higher value –  Cody Guldner May 4 '13 at 2:28

13 Answers 13

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Since ul and li elements are display: block by default — give them auto margins and a width that is smaller than their container.

ul {
    width: 70%;
    margin: auto;
}

If you've changed their display property, or done something that overrides normal alignment rules (such as floating them) then this won't work.

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as you said, float left was the problem ! thanks –  menardmam Nov 10 '09 at 14:14
1  
if this does not make you happy, this probably will: stackoverflow.com/questions/2865380/… –  Bruiser Dec 7 '11 at 16:18
1  
Setting width:auto; and display:inline-block; would allow your ul behave like a line of text. You could then use text-align:center; on the parent element. This would also allow your ul to grow and shrink as inner content changes, opposed to having a fixed width. –  i_a Feb 7 at 20:00

To center the ul and also have the li elements centered in it as well, and make the width of the ul change dynamically, use display: inline-block; and wrap it in a centered div.

<style type="text/css">
    .wrapper {
        text-align: center;
    }
    .wrapper ul {
        display: inline-block;
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
        /* For IE, the outcast */
        zoom:1;
        *display: inline;
    }
    .wrapper li {
        float: left;
        padding: 2px 5px;
        border: 1px solid black;
    }
</style>

<div class="wrapper">
    <ul>
        <li>Three</li>
        <li>Blind</li>
        <li>Mice</li>
    </ul>
</div>
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5  
This is the very perfect solution! Because my <ul> is dynamic. –  workdreamer Sep 22 '11 at 11:21
1  
+1 for such a helpful solution. Unfortunately, this does not seem to work on IE7 as the whole UL list appears to the left of the screen, instead of centering it. Can you please post a tweak that can fix this issue? Thank you. –  Devner Jan 21 '12 at 18:14
1  
Ok, I think it works. Thanks flipc.blogspot.com/2009/02/damn-ie7-and-inline-block.html. –  Aram Kocharyan Jan 22 '12 at 2:01
3  
Friends don't let friends use Internet Explorer –  Marius Butuc Jan 4 '13 at 16:32
2  
This is a brilliant solution to this problem - thanks! –  dopey Apr 6 '13 at 13:20

Could either be

div ul
{
 width: [INSERT FIXED WIDTH]
 margin: 0 auto;
}

or

div li
{
text-align: center;
}

depends on how it should look like (or combining those)

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The latter option wouldn't center the list items, only their inline content. –  Quentin Nov 10 '09 at 13:52
    
Still, if the <li> aren't styled, it looks the same. –  Florian Peschka Nov 10 '09 at 14:33

To center a block object (e.g. the ul) you need to set a width on it and then you can set that objects left and right margins to auto.

To center the inline content of block object (e.g. the inline content of li) you can set the css property text-align: center;.

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Just add text-align: center; to your <ul>. Problem solved.

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Interesting but try this with floated li elements inside the ul: Example here

The problem now: the ul needs a fixed width to actually sit in the center. However we want to be it relative to the container width (or dynamic), margin: 0 auto on the ul does not work.

A better way is to let go of UL/Li list and use a different approach example here

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1 Write style="text-align: center;" to parent div of ul

2 Write style=" display:inline-table;" to ul

3 Write style=" display:inline;" to li

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Try

div#divID ul {margin:0 auto;}
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If you know the width of the ul then you can simply set the margin of the ul to 0 auto;

This will align the ul in the middle of the containing div

Example:

HTML:

<div id="container">
 <ul>
  <li>Item1</li>
  <li>Item2</li>
 </ul>
<div>

CSS:

  #container ul{
    width:300px;
    margin:0 auto;
  }
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<div id="container">
  <table width="100%" height="100%">
    <tr>
      <td align="center" valign="middle">
        <ul>
          <li>item 1</li>
          <li>item 2</li>
          <li>item 3</li>
        </ul>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</div>
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Here is the solution I could find:

#wrapper {
  float:right;
  position:relative;
  left:-50%;
  text-align:left;
}
#wrapper ul {
  list-style:none;
  position:relative;
  left:50%;
}

#wrapper li{
  float:left;
  position:relative;
}
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Another option is:

HTML

<nav>
  <ul class = "main-nav"> 
   <li> Productos </li>
   <li> Catalogo </li>
   <li> Contact </li>  
   <li> Us </li>
  </ul>
</nav>    

CSS:

nav {
  text-align: center;
}

nav .main-nav li {
  float: left;
  width: 20%;
  margin-right: 5%;
  font-size: 36px;
  text-align: center;
}
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use oldschool center-tags

<div> <center> <ul> <li>...</li> </ul></center> </div>

:-)

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You should avoid using style-type expressions in markup-code. That's what CSS was made for! –  Florian Peschka Nov 10 '09 at 13:50
    
Workable but do note that: "The center element was deprecated in HTML 4.01, and is not supported in XHTML 1.0 Strict DTD" from w3schools.com/TAGS/tag_center.asp –  o.k.w Nov 10 '09 at 13:50
4  
sigh W3Schools providing incomplete, wrong information as usual. It was deprecated in 4.0 not 4.01, and doesn't appear in any Strict variant (singling out XHTML 1.0 is an odd choice). –  Quentin Nov 10 '09 at 13:51
    
As mentioned before these were deprecated in HTML 4.01 ... also that's just bad practice ... –  Jonny Haynes Nov 26 '09 at 8:33
    
Yes, he shouldn't use this kind of tag, but this is not a reason to deserve a negative answer. Sometimes, we want the fatest solution. And for me this answer is positive. –  workdreamer Sep 22 '11 at 11:25

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