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I have this type

Inductive coef :=
| Mycoef_ex2 : matrix -> coef
with matrix :=
| My_matrix : list (list coef) -> matrix.

Inductive my_type :=
| Mytype_ex1 : list my_type  -> my_type
| Mytype_int : Z -> my_type
| Mytype_coef : coef -> my_type.

In Ocaml I can write:

let test_mytype := function
| Mytype_ex1 [Mytype_coef (Mycoef_ex2 (My_matrix m)); Mytype_int i] :: ps -> ...

I want to use the argument m and i in the same function where my function needed both arguments.But In Coq I cannot do that for example if I write in Coq

Definition test_mytype (m: my_type) :=
 match m with
  | Mytype_ex1 (Mytype_coef (Mycoef_ex2 (My_matrix m)))
  | Mytype_int i :: ps => my_function m i
   ...
 end.

I got an error :

Toplevel input, characters 82-215:
Error: The components of this disjunctive pattern must bind the same variables.

If I write this function like below the Coq will accepted, but I cannot use both m and i as the same time

Definition test_mytype (m: my_type) :=
 match m with
  | Mytype_ex1 (Mytype_coef (Mycoef_ex2 (My_matrix m))) :: ps => ...
  | Mytype_ex1 (Mytype_int i) :: ps => ...
    ...
 end.

I also tried to use the matching for example:

Definition test_mytype (m1, m2: my_type) :=
 match m1, m2 with
  | Mytype_ex1 (Mytype_coef (Mycoef_ex2 (My_matrix m))) :: ps, 
  | Mytype_ex1 (Mytype_int i) :: ps => ...
    ...
 end.

But my problem is both m and i should belong to the same m: my_type.

Do you know how can I write the function test_mytype that can use both m and i as the same time in Coq?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It seems that you do not have a good grasp of what disjunctive patterns are about.

In OCaml

Let us say, for example, that I have, in OCaml, defined a type either:

type either = Left of int | Right of int

Hence, a value of type either is just an integer tagged with either Left or Right.

One obvious function that I can now write is int_of_either, which takes a value of type either as its argument and produces an integer as its result:

let int_of_either = function
  | Left x -> x
  | Right x -> x

Now, note that the cases for Left and Right have identical right-hand sides. In that case, disjunctive patterns allow me to render my function just a bit more concise by having the two arms of the pattern match share a single right-hand side:

let int_of_either = function
  | Left x
  | Right x -> x

Of course, this only works out if the variable x is bound in both patterns. (Moreover, the bindings should be consistent in the sense that they should agree on the type of x. Here, they do as both cases bind x to a value of type int.)

That is, if I write, for instance

let int_of_either = function
  | Left x
  | Right y -> y

the compiler will reject my program and complain about y not occurring in the case for Left:

Error: Variable y must occur on both sides of this | pattern

In Coq

In a similar manner, if, in Coq, I define a type either

Inductive either :=
  | Left : Z -> either
  | Right : Z -> either.

and a function int_of_either

Definition int_of_either (e : either) : Z :=
  match e with
  | Left x => x
  | Right x => x
  end.

then I can use a disjunctive pattern to rewrite int_of_either into

Definition int_of_either (e : either) : Z :=
  match e with
  | Left x
  | Right x => x
  end.

However, if I write

Definition int_of_either (e : either) : Z :=
  match e with
  | Left x
  | Right y => y
  end.

the compiler complains with

Error: The components of this disjunctive pattern must bind the same variables.

which is exactly the error you are getting.


In conclusion, I recommend forgetting about disjunctive patterns for now and first try to get your function defined with a dedicated right-hand side for each arm of your pattern match and only then consider whether your function can be written in a slightly more compact form.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I see the problem. – Quyen Jun 13 '13 at 8:31
 match m with
  | Mytype_ex1 (Mytype_coef (Mycoef_ex2 (My_matrix m)))
  | Mytype_int i :: ps
     => my_function m i

Is wrong and cannot work. Not only the first matches a my_type and the second a my_type list, but in a disjunctive pattern (or-pattern) both sides must capture the same variable: it doesn't make sense to defined m in a case, i in the other, and to expect both to be defined in a branch.

So I don't know what you're trying to do, but Coq and OCaml has the same limitations here, and there should not be a difference.

share|improve this answer

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