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I'm trying to use Groovy mixin transformation on a spring-mvc controller class but Spring does not pickup the request mapping from the mixed in class.

class Reporter {
    @RequestMapping("report")
    public String doReport() {
        "report"
    }
}

@Mixin(Reporter)
@Controller
@RequestMapping("/a")
class AController {
    @RequestMapping("b")
    public String doB() {
        "b"
    }
}

When this code is run .../a/b url is mapped and works but .../a/report is not mapped and returns HTTP 404. In debug mode, I can access doReport method on AController by duck typing.

This type of request mapping inheritance actually works with Java classes when extends is used; so why it does not work with Groovy's mixin? I'm guessing it's either that mixin transformation does not transfer annotations on the method or that spring's component scanner works before the mixin is processed. Either way, is there a groovier way to achieve this functionality (I don't want AController to extend Reporter for other reasons, so that's not an option) ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can find below the responses I got from Guillaume Laforge (Groovy project manager) in Groovy users mailing list.

Hi,

I haven't looked at Spring MVC's implementation, but I suspect that it's using reflection to find the available methods. And "mixin" adding methods dynamically, it's not something that's visible through reflection.

We've had problems with @Mixin over the years, and it's implementation is far from ideal and bug-ridden despite our efforts to fix it. It's likely we're going to deprecate it soon, and introduce something like static mixins or traits, which would then add methods "for real" in the class, which means such methods like doReport() would be seen by a framework like Spring MVC.

There are a couple initiatives in that area already, like a prototype branch from Cédric and also something in Grails which does essentially that (ie. adding "real" methods through an AST transformation). Although no firm decision has been made there, it's something we'd like to investigate and provide soon.

Now back to your question, perhaps you could investigate using @Delegate? You'd add an @Delegate Reporter reporter property in your controller class. I don't remember if @Delegate carries the annotation, I haven't double checked, but if it does, that might be a good solution for you in the short term.

Guillaume

Using the @Delegate transformation did not work on its own, so I needed another suggestion.

One more try... I recalled us speaking about carrying annotations for delegated methods... and we actually did implement that already. It's not on by default, so you have to activate it with a parameter for the @Delegate annotation: http://groovy.codehaus.org/gapi/groovy/lang/Delegate.html#methodAnnotations

Could you please try with @Delegate(methodAnnotations = true) ?

And the actual solution is:

class Reporter {
    @RequestMapping("report")
    public String doReport() {
        "report"
    }
}

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/a")
class AController {
    @Delegate(methodAnnotations = true) private Reporter = new Reporter

    @RequestMapping("b")
    public String doB() {
        "b"
    }
}
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When you map requests with annotations, what happens is that once the container is started, it scans the classpath, looks for annotated classes and methods, and builds the map internally, instead of you manually writing the deployment descriptor.

The scanner reads methods and annotations from the compiled .class files. Maybe Groovy mixins are implemented in such a way that they are resolved at runtime, so the scanner software can't find them in the compiled bytecode.

To solve this problem, you have to find a way to statically mixin code at compile time, so that the annotated method is actually written to the class file.

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