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I have Table like this

create table #tmp(dt Date, price float)

insert into #tmp values('01-Jan-2013', 55.60)
insert into #tmp values('02-Jan-2013', 50.22)
insert into #tmp values('03-Jan-2013', 52.00)
insert into #tmp values('04-Jan-2013', 55.90)
insert into #tmp values('05-Jan-2013', 60.60)

select * from #tmp order by dt
drop table #tmp

I want to get return value of two days price in one SQL statement. Calculation is simple, for example if I want to Calculate Return value of Date 02-Jan-2013 is: price value of 02-Jan-2013 divide by price value of 01-Jan-2013 and -1.

I want a output like the bellow

dt          |price  |Return
-------------------------------------
01-Jan-2013 |55.6   |0
-------------------------------------
02-Jan-2013 |50.22  |-0.09676259
-------------------------------------
03-Jan-2013 |52     |0.035444046
-------------------------------------
04-Jan-2013 |55.9   |0.075
-------------------------------------
05-Jan-2013 |60.6   |0.084078712

How Can I get the result whithin a single SQL Statement?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems fairly straightforward:

select
   t1.dt,t1.price,
  (t1.price/t2.price)-1 as [return]
from
   #tmp t1
      left join
   #tmp t2
      on t1.dt = DATEADD(day,1,t2.dt)

Note that this currently returns NULL for the first row rather than 0, but that could be fixed by wrapping the calculation in a COALESCE(...,0) if required. Note, also, that this assumes that there are values for every day. If that's not so, we need a more complex query.


If you need to allow for missing dates, you're going to have to pay a price for a significantly slower query:

select
   t1.dt,t1.price,
  (t1.price/t2.price)-1 as [return]
from
   #tmp t1
      left join
   #tmp t2
      on t2.dt < t1.dt
      left join
   #tmp t3
      on t3.dt < t1.dt and
         t2.dt < t3.dt
where
   t3.dt is null

Ignoring for the moment that all these rows are coming from the same table, what we're basically saying is to pair the t1 rows with any t2 rows which occur before the t1 rows. We then try to find (via t3) any rows which occur after the t2 rows, but still before the t1 rows. Only if we cannot locate a t3 row is the t2 row the one we wanted - it's the latest possible previous row. Sorry if that sounds convoluted, always searching for a better way to explain this.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it will server my purpose –  M. Rain Jun 13 '13 at 8:16
    
in some dates it returns wrong value if the date is missing, you already mentioned here that these values are for everyday. Can I get that complex query where date is sequential but some dates are missing. Thanks. –  M. Rain Jun 14 '13 at 2:55

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