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I have text in a file like:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define MIN 0
#define MAX 100

I want to insert a macro before the 1st #define like:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \ 
(a>b?(return a):(return b))
#define MIN 0
#define MAX 100

I tried my luck with sed, but it wasn't so successful. I have to do this in a bash script, say add_macro.sh, which is executed as:

./add_macro file.c

and contains:

var1="#define"
var2="#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \ /\n(a>b?(return a):(return b))"
sed "H;${x;s/$var1 .*\n/$var2&/;p;}" $1 > $1.tmp

When I run the above script, it does something like:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define MIN 0
#define MAX 100


#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define MAXIMUM(a,b)          //no '\' is printed
(a>b?(return a):(return b))
#define MIN 0
#define MAX 100

It repeats the data and does substitution only once. Any help will be most appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

var1="#define"
var2='#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \\ \
    (a>b?(return a):(return b))'
sed "0,/^$var1/{/^$var1/s/$var1/$var2\n$var1/}" $1

or a bit shorter:

sed "0,/^$var1/s/^$var1/$var2\n$var1/" $1
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Thanks for the solution but it doesn't work if the 1st occurence of a #define is in a comment. For eg, .... // #defines are defined in this file..bla bla bla .. #define MAX 100.. –  brokenfoot Jun 13 '13 at 8:53
    
edited to handle // comments, but with /* comments, I don't know :) –  perreal Jun 13 '13 at 8:55
    
I have posted a solution, that checks the 1st character should be a "#", followed by "define". –  brokenfoot Jun 13 '13 at 8:57
var1="#define MIN"
var2="#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \\\\ \n(a>b?(return a):(return b))"
sed "s/${var1}.*$/$var2\n&/g;" $1 > $1.tmp
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your solution repeats the lines. I have posted a solution that works fine. Thanks! –  brokenfoot Jun 13 '13 at 8:59

A simpler pattern:

var1="#define MIN 0"
var2="#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \\\\\n(a>b?(return a):(return b))"
cat test.c |sed "s%^\($var1\)$%$var2\n\1%g"

You get:

samveen@precise:/tmp$ bash replace.sh
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \
(a>b?(return a):(return b))
#define MIN 0
#define MAX 100

This also ensures that it'll replace only those lines that match just the exact contents of var1, ensured by the ^ and $ anchors in the pattern.

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@perreal My understanding is that he wants to match the first define statement in the example program, which is ^#define MIN 0$. In case he wants to do this on the first ^#define instead, then you have the correct answer :). –  Samveen Jun 13 '13 at 8:28
    
Yes. I want to match just the 1st occurrence. Apologize for the confusion! :) –  brokenfoot Jun 13 '13 at 9:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I got it:

var2='#define MAXIMUM(a,b) \\\n(a>b?(return a):(return b))'
var1='#define'
sed "H; 0,/^$var1 .*/s//$var2\n&/1;" $1 > $1.tmp

Thanks everyone for the input!

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