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I've got a String array that I'm wanting to add to a string builder by way of LINQ.

What I'm basically trying to say is "For each item in this array, append a line to this StringBuilder".

I can do this quite easily using a foreach loop however the following code doesn't seem to do anything. What am I missing?

stringArray.Select(x => stringBuilder.AppendLine(x));

Where as this works:

foreach(String item in stringArray)
{
  stringBuilder.AppendLine(item);
}
share|improve this question
    
i wouldn´t use the .Select command... isn´t the ForEach command available? – sebagomez Nov 10 '09 at 14:21
    
I've renamed StringBuilder and StringArray to use a lower case first char. Just to make it clear that I'm refering to instance variables and not types. – Jamie Dixon Nov 10 '09 at 14:22
    
yes it is... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zecdkyw2.aspx :) – sebagomez Nov 10 '09 at 14:23
up vote 16 down vote accepted

If you insist on doing it in a LINQy way:

StringBuilder builder = StringArray.Aggregate(
                            new StringBuilder(),
                            (sb, s) => sb.AppendLine(s)
                        );

Alternatively, as Luke pointed out in a comment on another post, you could say

Array.ForEach(StringArray, s => stringBuilder.AppendLine(s));

The reason that Select does not work is because Select is for projecting and creating an IEnumerable of the projection. So the line of code

StringArray.Select(s => stringBuilder.AppendLine(s))

does not iterate over the StringArray calling stringBuilder.AppendLine(s) on each iteration. Rather, it creates an IEnumerable<StringBuilder> that can be enumerated over.

I suppose that you could say

var e = stringArray.Select(x => stringBuilder.AppendLine(x));
StringBuilder sb = e.Last();
Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());

but that is really hideous.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jason. Your answer explains why the Select method didn't achieve the result I wanted and why the foreach was working. I'll stick with the foreach. I was really just curious about what I was missing. Now I know. – Jamie Dixon Nov 10 '09 at 14:27

Use the "ForEach" extension method instead of "Select".

stringArray.ForEach(x => stringBuilder.AppendLine(x));
share|improve this answer

StringArray.DoForAll(x => StringBuilder.AppendLine(x));

share|improve this answer
    
What is DoForAll? – jason Nov 10 '09 at 14:21
    
Sorry, I've had this extension method for so long, I forgot is not part of the framework. public static class CommonExtensions { public static void DoForAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> action) where T: class { if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action"); foreach (var item in items) action(item); } } – vladhorby Nov 10 '09 at 14:37
    
@vladhorby: One view on why DoForAll and other equivalent extensions are not implemented: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/18/… – jason Nov 10 '09 at 15:25

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