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we are planning to adjust your DB-structure to a more flexible layout. For each person a set of values is stored, which differs from client to client (that means, the clients of our clients). We want to change the current design that looks like this (simplified):

T_PersonsData
==============
*#Person_Id  Field_01   Field_02     Field_03     ...  Field_N
-------------------------------------------------------------
01          'Bob'      'Simpson'    '1980-03-02' ...  NULL
02          'John'     'Smith'      '1972-04-10' ...  NULL
03          'Sanders'  'Michael'    'Chicago'    ...  NULL
04          'Andrews'  '1978-10-02'  NULL        ...  NULL

T_PersonData_Definitions
=========================
*#Client_Id   *Field   Name             #Type_Id
-------------------------------------------------
101           01      'First name'      1 (String)
101           02      'Last name'       1 (String)
101           03      'Date of birth'   3 (DateTime)
...           ...     ...               ...
203           N       'Address'         1 (String)

(* = Primary key)
(# = Foreign key)

to something like this:

T_PersonsData_New
=================
*#Person_Id  *#Field_Id   Value
--------------------------------------
01           01           'Bob'
01           02           'Simpson'
01           03           '1980-03-02'
...          ...          ...

T_PersonsData_Definitions_New
=============================
*Field_Id   #Client_Id    Name             #Type
-----------------------------------------------
01          101           'First Name'      1
02          101           'Last Name'       1
03          101           'Date of Birth'   3
...         ...            ...              ...

The obvious advantages are:

  • Scalability / flexibility (various amounts of field-types can be used)
  • preventing unnecessary NULL-entries
  • etc. ...

However, a simple person-search for instance, like:

SELECT Person_Id
  FROM T_Persons_Data
 WHERE Field_01 = 'Bob'
   AND FIeld_02 LIKE 'S%'
   AND ...

...where several search-options could be added as WHERE-clauses, would then look like this:

SELECT DISTINCT Person_Id
  FROM T_PersonsData_New
 WHERE (SELECT Value 
          FROM T_PersonsData_New
         WHERE Field_Id = 01
           AND Person_Id = Person_Id) = 'Bob'
   AND (SELECT Value 
          FROM T_PersonsData_New
         WHERE Field_Id = 02
           AND Person_Id = Person_Id) LIKE 'S%'
   AND ...

... in the new design.

Of course, I would be grateful for any suggestions for a more elegant way to implement such a search. Would you recommend to change the DB-design like this?

Besides, I want to implement a (simple!) performance test to compare both designs. What would you suggest, how could that look like? Which scenarios would be most performance-critical?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
5  
Think hard and test hard before implementing a SQL anti-pattern‌​. Yours starts on slide 16. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jun 13 '13 at 13:41
    
@MikeSherrill'Catcall' Thanks for the link! As this new design is not implemented yet and I am to decide, whether we should (based on the tests), it was very helpful. –  marsze Jun 13 '13 at 13:48
1  
This is a decision you will regret. –  Neil McGuigan Jun 13 '13 at 19:04
1  
That old chestnut again: tonyandrews.blogspot.co.uk/2004/10/… –  sqlvogel Jun 13 '13 at 22:31
    
@sqlvogel Thanks again for the useful link! The more I think (& read) about this, the better I understand why this is a bad idea and I'm relieved that this change was not my idea in the first place ^^ I will promote a different solution. –  marsze Jun 14 '13 at 6:51

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