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I'm trying to write unit tests around a custom SynchronizationContext implementation.

The two important operations on this class are Send and Post, where Send invokes a delegate synchronously and Post invokes a delegate asynchronously.

I would like to write unit tests to verify this behaviour, that the delegates were executed synchronously or asynchronously. I don't want the tests to rely on delays for success cases, because it artificially prolongs the tests running (but it's reasonable to have failures cause a delay) in execution.

Initially I have considered using Tasks to signal the execution of a delegate:

var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();

var context = new CustomSynchronizationContext();

context.Send((state) => tcs.SetResult(null), null);

// Task should already be completed!
Assert.IsTrue(this.tcs.Task.IsCompleted);

However, this does not ensure the delegate was not executed asynchronously very quickly before the test runner could continue.

How can I arrange a test around the context to ensure that Send blocks for the completion of the delegate and Post does not, but that the delegates are both invoked?

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1  
+1 for the question and the Name "Tragedian" a person who solve problems... :) –  Jigar Pandya Jun 13 '13 at 9:15
    
Isn't it possible to do a postback of the Thread.ManagedThreadId that the delegate executed on? If it was the same as the main thread, it was executed synchronously, otherwise async. –  Davio Jun 13 '13 at 9:31
    
The synchronization context won't run any delegates on the calling thread, so I'm afraid not. Threads are just an implementation detail. –  Tragedian Jun 13 '13 at 9:34
    
Maybe unit tests are simply no the right tool for this kind of problem, just like for other multithreaded test cases. –  Dirk Jun 13 '13 at 9:35
    
My primary objective is to assert the behaviour; I'd assumed unit tests were a viable mechanism, but I'm happy to entertain answers that don't go this route. –  Tragedian Jun 13 '13 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

Incorporating my idea:

var mainThreadId = Thread.ManagedThreadId;
var sendThreadId;
context.Send((state) => sendThreadId = Thread.ManagedThreadId);
Assert.AreEqual(mainThreadId, sendThreadId);

Don't know if this actually works, you'll have to check.

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The synchronization context won't run any delegates on the calling thread, so I'm afraid not. Threads are just an implementation detail in asynchronous programming. –  Tragedian Jun 13 '13 at 9:39
    
Yeah, “synchronous” and “asynchronous” is not the same as “on the same thread” and “on another thread”. Synchronous method could execute the delegate on another thread and the synchronously wait for it to finish. –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 17:52

I believe you can achieve this using a pair of ManualResetEvents. Using the code below, the slow down is only experienced if the tests failed (the numbers are pretty high and could probably be reduced safely). The idea here is that we assert the order in which things must occur that can only happen if we block or don't block.

For the synchronous test:

var incall = new ManualResetEvent(false);
var unblock = new ManualResetEvent(false);
var context = new CustomSynchronizationContext();
var t = Task.Run(() => context.Send(state =>
{
    incall.Set();
    unblock.WaitOne(5000);
}, null));
Assert.IsTrue(incall.WaitOne(1000));
Assert.IsFalse(t.Wait(10));
unblock.Set();
Assert.IsTrue(t.Wait(1000));

for the Async test:

var incall = new ManualResetEvent(false);
var unblock = new ManualResetEvent(false);
var context = new CustomSynchronizationContext();
var t = Task.Run(() =>context.Post(state =>
{
    incall.Set();
    unblock.WaitOne(5000);
}, null));
Assert.IsTrue(incall.WaitOne(1000));
Assert.IsTrue(t.Wait(1000)); //This will timeout if unblock is blocking completion of the task
unblock.Set();
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But an asynchornous method could pass your synchronous test, if the timing was right. –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 17:56
    
are you referring to the fact that unblock may timeout before and the task completes before the last check or some other issue? –  jageall Jun 17 '13 at 19:29
    
No, that during your second Assert(), the asynchronous method may have already started the execution (so incall.WaitOne() completes immediately) but also have not have returned yet, so Status will still be Running. –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 19:37
    
doh, the dangers of trying to reduce the success path execution time too much, waiting 10 milliseconds on the task and asserting that complete is false should do the job...? –  jageall Jun 17 '13 at 20:21
    
I'm not sure 10 ms is enough, given how thread scheduling works. –  svick Jun 17 '13 at 21:18

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