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I just started playing with metaprogramming and I am working on different tasks just to explore the domain. One of these was to generate a unique integer and map it to type, like below:

int myInt = TypeInt<AClass>::value;

Where value should be a compile time constant, which in turn may be used further in meta programs.

I want to know if this is at all possible, and in that case how. Because although I have learned much about exploring this subject I still have failed to come up with an answer.

(P.S. A yes/no answer is much more gratifying than a c++ solution that doesn't use metaprogramming, as this is the domain that I am exploring)

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Do you also want to support types like void(*)(AClass const(*)[4])? I think it's still possible if you treat a type like a tree where fundamental types and user-defined types are the leafs. –  sellibitze Nov 10 '09 at 17:01
    
Your example does not require ::value be a compile time constant. Is that a requirement? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 10 '09 at 17:56
1  
I think technically, this is impossible to realize, though for arbitrary types: There are far more types than there are possible numbers you can generate. Remember each type of struct A; struct B; B[1]; B[2]; etc are different. How could this ever work? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 10 '09 at 18:35
1  
Why you would want to do this would be more interesting. Note there is a type_info object (returned by a the typeid operator) that you can use to compare two types. –  Loki Astari Nov 10 '09 at 18:39
    
@litb: Once you have an injective mapping that maps user defined types to numbers (this requires support from the user) the rest is not a problem anymore. Think of a type as a tree. For example: A function type would correspond to a tree where the root node identifies itself as a N-ary function and return type and parameter types are the children, etc etc etc. The tree can be encoded via a sequence of "symbols" and this sequence can be mapped to an integer. –  sellibitze Nov 10 '09 at 19:08
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8 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The closest I've come so far is being able to keep a list of types while tracking the distance back to the base (giving a unique value). Note the "position" here will be unique to your type if you track things correctly (see the main for the example)

template <class Prev, class This>
class TypeList
{
public:
   enum
   {
      position = (Prev::position) + 1,
   };
};

template <>
class TypeList<void, void>
{
public:
  enum
  {
     position = 0,
  };
};


#include <iostream>

int main()
{
        typedef TypeList< void, void> base;  // base
        typedef TypeList< base, double> t2;  // position is unique id for double
        typedef TypeList< t2, char > t3; // position is unique id for char

        std::cout << "T1 Posn: " << base::position << std::endl;
        std::cout << "T2 Posn: " << t2::position << std::endl;
        std::cout << "T3 Posn: " << t3::position << std::endl;

}

This works, but naturally I'd like to not have to specify a "prev" type somehow. Preferably figuring out a way to track this automatically. Maybe I'll play with it some more to see if it's possible. Definitely an interesting/fun puzzle.

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This is the same solution that I thought of, but I never got around to removing that "prev". But guess there is no way to save this state. As I understand this correspond very much to the functional nature of template metaprogramming. –  daramarak Nov 11 '09 at 8:53
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In principle, this is possible, although the solution probably isn't what you're looking for.

In short, you need to provide an explicit mapping from the types to the integer values, with one entry for each possible type:

template< typename T >
struct type2int
{
   // enum { result = 0 }; // do this if you want a fallback value
};

template<> struct type2int<AClass> { enum { result = 1 }; };
template<> struct type2int<BClass> { enum { result = 2 }; };
template<> struct type2int<CClass> { enum { result = 3 }; };

const int i = type2int<T>::result;

If you don't supply the fallback implementation in the base template, this will fail for unknown types if T, otherwise it would return the fallback value.

Depending on your context, there might be other possibilities, too. For example, you could define those numbers within within the types themselves:

class AClass {
  public:
    enum { inta_val = 1 };
  // ...
};

class BClass {
  public:
    enum { inta_val = 2 };
  // ...
};

// ... 

template< typename T >
struct type2int
{
   enum { result = T::int_val }; // will fail for types without int_val
};

If you give more context, there might be other solutions, too.

Edit:

Actually there isn't any more context to it. I was looking into if it actually was possible, but without assigning the numbers itself.

I think Mike's idea of ordering is a good way to do this (again, for a fixed set of types) without having to explicitly assign numbers: they're implicitly given by the ordering. However, I think that this would be easier by using a type list. The index of any type in the list would be its number. I think something like the following might do:

// basic type list manipulation stuff
template< typename T1, typename T2, typename T3...>
struct type_list;

// meta function, List is assumed to be some instance of type_list
template< typename T, class List >
struct index_of {
  enum { result = /* find index of T in List */ };
};

// the list of types you support
typedef type_list<AClass, BClass, CClass> the_type_list;

// your meta function
template< typename T >
struct type2int
{
   enum { result = index_of<T, the_type_list>::result };
};
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Actually there isn't any more context to it. I was looking into if it actually was possible, but without assigning the numbers itself. –  daramarak Nov 10 '09 at 15:16
    
Re the type_list: you'll need C++0x or compiler-specific extensions for the variadic template. Apart from that, it's neater than my solution. –  Mike Seymour Nov 10 '09 at 21:34
    
@Mike: You can do that without variadic templates (type lists have been out there for a long time), although it's not as neat and the maximal number of types is fixed. In fact, I added the ... merely to suggest more parameters, and it only occurred to me afterwards that it could be read as variadic templates. (I don't even know if this is the right syntax.) –  sbi Nov 10 '09 at 21:47
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I think it is possible to do it for a fixed set of types, but quite a bit of work. You'll need to define a specialisation for each type, but it should be possible to use compile-time asserts to check for uniqueness. I'll assume a STATIC_ASSERT(const_expr), like the one in Boost.StaticAssert, that causes a compilation failure if the expression is false.

Suppose we have a set of types that we want unique IDs for - just 3 for this example:

class TypeA;
class TypeB;
typedef int TypeC;

We'll want a way to compare types:

template <typename T, typename U> struct SameType
{
    const bool value = false;
};

template <typename T> struct SameType<T,T>
{
    const bool value = true;
};

Now, we define an ordering of all the types we want to enumerate:

template <typename T> struct Ordering {};

template <> struct Ordering<void>
{
    typedef TypeC prev;
    typedef TypeA next;
};

template <> struct Ordering<TypeA>
{
    typedef void  prev;
    typedef TypeB next;
};

template <> struct Ordering<TypeB>
{
    typedef TypeA prev;
    typedef TypeC next;
};

template <> struct Ordering<TypeC>
{
    typedef TypeB prev;
    typedef void  next;
};

Now we can define the unique ID:

template <typename T> struct TypeInt
{
    STATIC_ASSERT(SameType<Ordering<T>::prev::next, T>::value);
    static int value = TypeInt<T>::prev::value + 1;
};

template <> struct TypeInt<void>
{
    static int value = 0;
};

NOTE: I haven't tried compiling any of this. It may need typename adding in a few places, and it may not work at all.

You can't hope to map all possible types to an integer field, because there are an unbounded number of them: pointer types with arbitrary levels of indirection, array types of arbitrary size and rank, function types with arbitrary numbers of arguments, and so on.

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Stupid question from non template metaprogrammer. How is TypeA/TypeB/TypeC resolved when its not specified as a template parameter or specialization? It seems like somehow these need to bound (either implicitly somehow or explicitly). I don't see how that's being done here or how it would be done. I've tried compiling your code, and I get errors about Type(A|B|C) not being defined, and I'm not sure how to resolve it. –  Doug T. Nov 10 '09 at 16:15
    
They are the types that you want to enumerate (such as "AClass" in the question). I've added example declarations to the answer. –  Mike Seymour Nov 10 '09 at 17:04
    
@Mike: I like your idea of ordering. However, don't you think putting the types into a type list and using their indexes in that type list would be much simpler? –  sbi Nov 10 '09 at 18:54
    
@Mike: I have appended an outline of such a solution to my answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1708458/1708628#1708628 –  sbi Nov 10 '09 at 19:54
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This does what you want. Values are assigned on need. It takes advantage of the way statics in functions are assigned.

inline size_t next_value()
{
     static size_t id = 0;
     size_t result = id;
     ++id;
     return result;
}

/** Returns a small value which identifies the type.
    Multiple calls with the same type return the same value. */
template <typename T>
size_t get_unique_int()
{
     static size_t id = next_value();
     return id;
}

It's not template metaprogramming on steroids but I count that as a good thing (believe me!)

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But this will not generate the the values at compile time, which are the purpose of this task. –  daramarak Mar 22 '10 at 8:24
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This may be doing some "bad things" and probably violates the standard in some subtle ways... but thought I'd share anyway .. maybe some one else can sanitise it into something 100% legal? But it seems to work on my compiler.

The logic is this .. construct a static member function for each type you're interested in and take its address. Then convert that address to an int. The bits that are a bit suspect are : 1) the function ptr to int conversion. and 2) I'm not sure the standard guarantees that the addresses of the static member functions will all correctly merge for uses in different compilation units.

typedef void(*fnptr)(void);

union converter
{
  fnptr f;
  int i;
};

template<typename T>
struct TypeInt
{
  static void dummy() {}
  static int value() { converter c; c.f = dummy; return c.i; }
};

int main()
{
  std::cout<< TypeInt<int>::value() << std::endl;
  std::cout<< TypeInt<unsigned int>::value() << std::endl;
  std::cout<< TypeInt< TypeVoidP<int> >::value() << std::endl;
}
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Also note that for many uses where you just need to compare the ints you can get away without the conversion from function pointer to int, and just compare the function pointers to the dummy function. –  Michael Anderson Mar 21 '10 at 6:33
    
But this will not give you an unique typeint at compile time will it? –  daramarak Mar 22 '10 at 8:26
    
Correct, the int from this is not a compile time constant. However I think that the address of TypeInt<T>::dummy is a compile time constant if that will suffice. –  Michael Anderson Mar 22 '10 at 8:58
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I'm not aware of a way to map a compile-time constant integer to a type, but I can give you the next best thing. This example demonstrates a way to generate a unique identifier for a type which - while it is not an integral constant expression - will generally be evaluated at compile time. It's also potentially useful if you need a mapping between a type and a unique non-type template argument.

struct Dummy
{
};

template<typename>
struct TypeDummy
{
    static const Dummy value;
};

template<typename T>
const Dummy TypeDummy<T>::value = Dummy();

typedef const Dummy* TypeId;

template<typename T, TypeId p = &TypeDummy<T>::value>
struct TypePtr
{
    static const TypeId value;
};

template<typename T, TypeId p>
const TypeId TypePtr<T, p>::value = p;

struct A{};

struct B{};

const TypeId typeA = TypePtr<A>::value;
const TypeId typeB = TypePtr<B>::value;

I developed this as a workaround for performance issues with ordering types using typeid(A) == typeid(B), which a certain compiler fails to evaluate at compile time. It's also useful to be able to store TypeId values for comparison at runtime: e.g. someType == TypePtr<A>::value

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I don't think it's possible without assigning the numbers yourself or having a single file know about all the types. And even then you will run into trouble with template classes. Do you have to assign the number for each possible instantiation of the class?

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I thought of the problem like this: Only the types that uses TypeToInt<T> should be given a number. –  daramarak Nov 11 '09 at 8:56
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type2int as compile time constant is impossible even in C++11. Maybe some rich guy should promise a reward for the anwser? Until then I'm using the following solution, which is basically equal to Matthew Herrmann's:

class type2intbase {
    template <typename T>
    friend struct type2int;

    static const int next() {
        static int id = 0; return id++;
    }
};

template <typename T>
struct type2int {
    static const int value() {
        static const int id = type2intbase::next(); return id;
    }
};

Note also

template <typename T>
struct type2ptr {
    static const void* const value() {
        return typeid(T).name();
    }
};
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