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I'm trying to convert class variables into instance variables on runtime, similar to what goes on in the Django ORM where the class variables of various types are converted into instance variables of the same types on runtime.

I'm using a metaclass to collect the class variables of certain types into a list and then setting them as instance variables on instantiation. I've tried deleting the original class variables and also keeping them and I'm getting different results in both cases, both undesirable.

  • I created a simple Field object which uses the _get_ and _set_ descriptors to convert values into types. A simple implementation of Field is the Textfield which unicodes the value on _get_.
  • On class creation the metaclass collects all attributes of type 'Field' into a list
  • The field list is then set to the class's as _meta['fields'].
  • When the class is instantiated into an object those _meta['fields'] are then setattr into the object. In one use case the original class var is deleted before hand.
  • I then test by creating two objects, setting the textfield attribute of one to some text, expecting the _get_ and _set_ to be called and both having different non conflicting values.

When the class variable is deleted, setting the Field value does not actually call _set or _get_ and the field simply changes type to a str. When I don't delete the class variable, the two objects instantiated share the values between them.

I've diluted my code into the code below which can be saved into a file and run with python test.py or imported into a python shell. Setting DELETE_CLASS_VAR to True will delete the class variables (to account for both test cases).

Obviously I'm missing something here. Failing to get this to work I'd use regular instance variable throughout but I quite like the Django model (and I have gone through the Django code without success) where the class variables set on a model then become its instance variables with some degree of type safety and specific methods set into them.

Thanks!

# Set to True to delete class variables
DELETE_CLASS_VAR = False

class Field(object): 
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.value = None
        self._args = args
        self._kwargs = kwargs

    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        print "__get__ called:", instance
        return self.to_python()

    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        print "__set__ called:", instance, value
        self.value = self.from_python(value)

    def to_python(self):
        return self.value

    def from_python(self, value):
        return value

class TextField(Field):
    def to_python(self):
        return unicode(self.value)

class ModelMetaClass(type):  
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        print "Creating new class: %s" % name
        obj = super(ModelMetaClass, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)
        print "class=", cls  
        _keys = attrs.keys()  
        _fields = []
        for key in _keys: 
            if isinstance(attrs[key], Field):
                _field = attrs.pop(key) 
                _fields.append( {'name':key, 'value': _field } )  
        setattr(obj, '_meta',  {'fields': _fields} )
        print "-"*80
        return obj


class Model(object): 
    __metaclass__ = ModelMetaClass

    def __init__(self):
        print "ROOT MODEL INIT", self._meta
        print "-"*80
        super(Model, self).__init__()
        _metafields = self._meta.get('fields',[])
        for _field in _metafields:
            _f = _field['value']
            if DELETE_CLASS_VAR and hasattr(self, _field['name']):
                delattr(self.__class__, _field['name'])
            setattr(self, _field['name'], _f.__class__(*_f._args, **_f._kwargs))

class BasicAdModel(Model):
    def __init__(self):
        super(BasicAdModel, self).__init__()
        self._id = None
        self.created_at = None
        self.last_modified = None 

class SpecialAdModel(BasicAdModel):
    textfield = TextField()

    def __init__(self):
        super(SpecialAdModel, self).__init__()
        print "INIT SPECIALAD", self._meta
        print "-"*80

print "* creating two models, Ad1 and Ad2"
Ad1 = SpecialAdModel()
Ad2 = SpecialAdModel() 
print "* Ad1 textfield attribute is", Ad1.textfield
print "* Setting Ad1 TextField instance to 'Text', expecting __set__ on Textfield to be called" 
Ad1.textfield = "Text"
if DELETE_CLASS_VAR:
    print "* If the class var was deleted on instantiation __get__ is not called here, and value is now str"
print "\tNew value is: ", Ad1.textfield 
print "* Getting Ad2.textfield, expecting __get__ to be called and no value."
if DELETE_CLASS_VAR:
    print "* If the class var was deleted - again __get__ is not called, attribute repalced with str"
print "\tAd2.textfield=", Ad2.textfield 
print "* Setting Ad2 text field "
Ad2.textfield = "A different text"
if not DELETE_CLASS_VAR:
    print "* When  class var is not deleted, the two separate instances share the value later set on Ad2 "
print "\tAd2.textfield=",Ad2.textfield 
print "\tAd1.textfield=", Ad1.textfield 
share|improve this question
    
Maybe you can elaborate a bit what you are trying to achieve? You seemd to be wanting to mimic Django's behaviour, but why don't you then use eg. itsFieldbase class to inherit from? Besides that monkey-patching the instance's _meta like you do might lead to a lot of unexpected behaviour... –  Bernhard Vallant Jun 13 '13 at 11:09
    
I am trying to create a similar model type to Django's models but specialised to our application and using MongoDb as the backend. I know of the django-nonrel port and the mongodb backend, but I'm not interested in most of the features - just need a model with some basic typing on fields that I can use for different purposes (extend to specialised models etc). The end result is to migrate a bunch of django based models and move them away from Postgres backend and into Mongo. I can do this using instance variables with the same approach but was hoping to give this approach a go first. –  Harel Jun 13 '13 at 11:19
    
Also, actual field implementations aside, the problem I'm having is converting those fields from initially class variables into the instance variables. –  Harel Jun 13 '13 at 11:28

3 Answers 3

Can only provide you some hints as you are trying to achieve something complex:

  • Try creating your own Options class - _meta is actually an instance of django.db.models.options.Options, some things in _meta just seem to behave like lists etc, but you should look into subclassing Django's class and overriding the stuff that's necessary for you.

  • Guess you are on the right way with working with Django's model meta class, but you should also look what magic is built into the field classes, the field's contribute_to_class is something quite essential...

  • Also try to use Django's Field class as a base class, as there might be code checking if a field is really something like that...

Well that's no real answer, just trying to provide a few hints!

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not trying to use Django's meta classing, just borrowing the concepts they use. I rather this be able to run as a self contained lightweight object wrapper around mongodb collections. Some sort of a flexible schema in code instead of the database. –  Harel Jun 13 '13 at 12:43

I think I solved your mystery - you assigned class not an instance of Field. So that helps:

class Model(object):
    __metaclass__ = ModelMetaClass

    def __init__(self):
        print "ROOT MODEL INIT", self._meta
        print "-"*80
        super(Model, self).__init__()
        _metafields = self._meta.get('fields',[])
        for _field in _metafields:
            _f = _field['value']
            if DELETE_CLASS_VAR and hasattr(self, _field['name']):
                delattr(self.__class__, _field['name'])
            setattr(self, _field['name'], \
                _f.__new__(_f.__class__, *_f._args, **_f._kwargs))

Works only if DELETE_CLASS_VAR is enabled.

However results of print in __set__() method forces my guts to signal me that there is still something wrong with the solution to be really fine and useful further.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. The lack of get__/__set prints in this case falls back on the other use case of my test (hence the delete class var switch). Once the class vars are deleted, the "Fields" are instance variables only, but then they seem to "lose" their descriptors. For a moment though, before I noticed this is the same result as what I got, I did do a little jig in the room when I thought the problem is solved. :) –  Harel Jun 13 '13 at 12:41

I managed to solve the problem eventually, with great thanks to pjdelport from the #Python IRC channel. Thanks to everyone who took time to comment and answer - it all helped a lot. As it turns out I did miss some vital part - the _get_ and _set_ descriptors are operating on a class level, and by using 'self' to set a value I was setting it on the class of the Field instead of the instance of the object.

The adapted solution is to use the instance argument passed to _get_ and _set_ and use the instance's _dict_ to place the value in instance directly without triggering _get_/_set_.

Obvisouly the DELETE_CLASS_VAR part is redundant as we don't want to delete the class vars. Now the objects can use typed instance vairables and also maintain a list of all fields in _meta['fields']. In fact, we dont' really need a metaclass here but its easy to have a collection of all the fields in the _meta property of the object which are created on class creation and not at each instantiation.

class Field(object): 
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.value = None
        self.name = None
        self._args = args
        self._kwargs = kwargs

    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        print "__get__ called: %s for %s" %(self.name, instance)
        if instance:
            return self.to_python(instance)
        else: # called directly from class - return itself
            return self 

    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        print "__set__ called: %s for %s with value %s" %(self.name, instance, value)
        self.value = self.from_python(instance, value)

    def to_python(self, instance): 
        return instance.__dict__.get(self.name)

    def from_python(self, instance, value):
        instance.__dict__[self.name] = value


class TextField(Field):
    def to_python(self, instance): 
        return unicode(instance.__dict__.get(self.name))

class ModelMetaClass(type):  
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        print "Creating new class: %s" % name
        obj = super(ModelMetaClass, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)
        print "class=", cls  
        _keys = attrs.keys()  
        _fields = []
        for key in _keys: 
            if isinstance(attrs[key], Field):
                _field = attrs.pop(key) 
                _field.name = key
                _fields.append( {'name':key, 'value': _field } )  
        setattr(obj, '_meta',  {'fields': _fields} ) 
        return obj


class Model(object): 
    __metaclass__ = ModelMetaClass

    def __init__(self): 
        super(Model, self).__init__()
        _metafields = self._meta.get('fields',[]) 


class BasicAdModel(Model):
    def __init__(self):
        super(BasicAdModel, self).__init__()
        self._id = None
        self.created_at = None
        self.last_modified = None 

class SpecialAdModel(BasicAdModel):
    textfield = TextField()

    def __init__(self):
        super(SpecialAdModel, self).__init__()
        print "INIT SPECIALAD", self._meta
        print "-"*80

print "* creating two models, Ad1 and Ad2"
Ad1 = SpecialAdModel()
Ad2 = SpecialAdModel() 
print "* Ad1 textfield attribute is", Ad1.textfield
print "* Setting Ad1 TextField instance to 'Text', expecting __set__ on Textfield to be called" 
Ad1.textfield = "Text"
print "\tNew value is: ", Ad1.textfield 
print "* Getting Ad2.textfield, expecting __get__ to be called and no value."
print "\tAd2.textfield=", Ad2.textfield 
print "* Setting Ad2 text field "
Ad2.textfield = "A different text"
print "\tAd2.textfield=",Ad2.textfield 
print "\tAd1.textfield=", Ad1.textfield 
share|improve this answer

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