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I need to query an Oracle database and get back which privileges are granted which roles and on which objects. Because I am going to either revoke or grant privileges to roles on objects according to configurations in a database management system I'm creating.

When I loop over the objects I'm going to process, I need to know if a role has already been granted any of the privileges on that object. This needs to be done before queuing up the GRANT or REVOKE to be performed.

The ODP.NET provider doesn't support running multiple Oracle statements, they must be run one by one or encapsulated in a BEGIN END block (which then counts as a single statement). Some statements even have to be put inside EXECUTE IMMEDIATE statements inside the block for it to work.

I know you can grant the same privilege on an object to a role multiple times without breaking anything, but (correct me if I'm wrong) revoking a privilege from role on an object which the role doesn't have will raise an exception and break the whole block execution.

Before performing any action on the Oracle database I first query for all the information I need to do my work, as I've found that to be best for performance, not playing ping pong with the server by querying for each object, role or privilege...

While processing the Oracle database I then compare the local information I just queried for, with the configured information, and perform different actions based on that.

I used SQLTracker and found Toad using this query for finding privileges granted on objects for a role and removed the roles where clause

SELECT dtp.PRIVILEGE,
       dtp.grantable ADMIN,
       dtp.grantee,
       dtp.grantor,
       dbo.owner,
       dbo.object_type,
       dbo.object_name,
       dbo.status,
       '' column_name
  FROM ALL_TAB_PRIVS dtp, DBA_OBJECTS dbo
 WHERE dtp.TABLE_SCHEMA = dbo.owner AND dtp.table_name = dbo.object_name
       AND dbo.object_type IN
              ('TABLE',
               'VIEW',
               'PACKAGE',
               'PROCEDURE',
               'FUNCTION')
UNION ALL
SELECT dcp.PRIVILEGE,
       dcp.grantable ADMIN,
       dcp.grantee,
       dcp.grantor,
       dbo.owner,
       dbo.object_type,
       dbo.object_name,
       dbo.status,
       dcp.column_name
  FROM ALL_COL_PRIVS dcp, DBA_OBJECTS dbo
 WHERE dcp.TABLE_SCHEMA = dbo.owner AND dcp.table_name = dbo.object_name
       AND dbo.object_type IN
              ('TABLE',
               'VIEW',
               'PACKAGE',
               'PROCEDURE',
               'FUNCTION');

I think this query will give me the information I need, but I'm afraid of performance issues if working with a very large Oracle database with A LOT of objects.

Q: What is the best possible way to query for which privileges are granted to which roles on which objects on an Oracle database?

The query I posted is just one of my own suggestions, but since I'm asking this question here I'm obviously not sure about it, and would like some input on the query.

Am I on the right track? Does it need to be modified? Should I scrap it and use a totally different approach?

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2 Answers 2

well, there is no way of retrieving data without actually retrieving it so you'l have to query the tables. if your problem is revoking privileges that don't exists you can write a function for it. something like this

create or replace procedure revoke_priv (
    object_owner    all_objects.owner%type , 
    object_name     all_objects.object_name%type , 
    privilege       all_tab_privs.privilege%type , 
    role_name       role_tab_privs.role%type)
authid current_user
as
    err number;
    stmt varchar2(4001);
begin
    stmt := 'revoke ' || privilege || ' on ' || object_owner || '.' || object_name ||' from ' || role_name;
    execute immediate stmt;
exception when others then 
    err := SQLCODE;
    if (err = -1927) then
        dbms_output.put_line('the privilege does not exists for the role');
    else
        raise;
    end if;
end;
/

and this is the scenario

SQL>create role my_role;

Role created.

SQL>grant select on scott.dept to my_role;

Grant succeeded.

SQL>select role , owner , table_name , PRIVILEGE from role_tab_privs where role = 'MY_ROLE';

ROLE                           OWNER                          TABLE_NAME                     PRIVILEGE
------------------------------ ------------------------------ ------------------------------ ----------------------------------------
MY_ROLE                        SCOTT                          DEPT                           SELECT

SQL>revoke select on scott.dept from my_role;

Revoke succeeded.

SQL>revoke select on scott.dept from my_role;
revoke select on scott.dept from my_role
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-01927: cannot REVOKE privileges you did not grant

SQL>grant select on scott.dept to my_role;

Grant succeeded.

SQL>exec revoke_priv('SCOTT','DEPT','SELECT','MY_ROLE');

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL>select role , owner , table_name , PRIVILEGE from role_tab_privs where role = 'MY_ROLE';

no rows selected

SQL>exec revoke_priv('SCOTT','DEPT','SELECT','MY_ROLE');
the privilege does not exists for the role

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL>drop role my_role;

Role dropped.
share|improve this answer
    
So you are saying its enough to query only the ROLE_TAB_PRIVS table? –  furier Jun 13 '13 at 13:49
    
this is the only way to get the roles privs. any other way will implicitly use this table any way. –  haki Jun 13 '13 at 19:59
    
seems like a good answer but i don't feel I can categorize it as the correct one, its a solution to prevent raising an exception when revoking privileges. –  furier Jun 14 '13 at 8:28
    
the answer to your question "What is the best possible way to query for which privileges are granted to which roles on which objects on an Oracle database?" - is as you wrote you'r self - query from the dictionary. –  haki Jun 14 '13 at 14:11
    
Its easy if you put where clause one the query, but what if you want to fetch all the info once and then just query locally from memory via lists to prevent ping pong traffic. Lets say you are trying to administrate a database on the other side of the world, if you have 1000 users, 40 roles and X * 1000 objects, you would have to do a lot of ping pong querying to get all the info you want. A much better solution would be to get all the info once, and then just query locally imo. But I'm afraid of the size of the query result, and wondering if there are any better once? –  furier Jun 20 '13 at 7:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ended up using the query provided in the question, and it seems to be working fine. All the information I need is there.

Tho I ended up removing the ALL part from the UNION ALL for no duplicate results giving me a smaller result set.

SELECT dtp.PRIVILEGE,
       dtp.grantable ADMIN,
       dtp.grantee,
       dtp.grantor,
       dbo.owner,
       dbo.object_type,
       dbo.object_name,
       dbo.status,
       '' column_name
  FROM ALL_TAB_PRIVS dtp, DBA_OBJECTS dbo
 WHERE dtp.TABLE_SCHEMA = dbo.owner AND dtp.table_name = dbo.object_name
       AND dbo.object_type IN
              ('TABLE',
               'VIEW',
               'PACKAGE',
               'PROCEDURE',
               'FUNCTION')
UNION
SELECT dcp.PRIVILEGE,
       dcp.grantable ADMIN,
       dcp.grantee,
       dcp.grantor,
       dbo.owner,
       dbo.object_type,
       dbo.object_name,
       dbo.status,
       dcp.column_name
  FROM ALL_COL_PRIVS dcp, DBA_OBJECTS dbo
 WHERE dcp.TABLE_SCHEMA = dbo.owner AND dcp.table_name = dbo.object_name
       AND dbo.object_type IN
              ('TABLE',
               'VIEW',
               'PACKAGE',
               'PROCEDURE',
               'FUNCTION');

The query can be very expensive depending on the size of the database queried, therefore it is recommended to only query once or use more where clause to narrow down the result set.

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