Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to Ruby, so apologies if my terminology is incorrect here.

I'm trying to make a subclass of hash, but am having trouble with initialising it. I want to be able to initialise it with an existing hash, and also some additional parameters, e.g.:

x = NewHash[{:a => b}, extra_param]

I tried to do that by overriding the static Hash [] operator:

class NewHash < Hash
  def self.[](hash_values, backend = nil)
    @backend = backend
    super(hash_values)
  end
end

This doesn't work, because the [] operator is static and I can't access non-static member variables, i.e. @backend is lost.

Is there anything I can do? The alternative is to use new, but that doesn't give me a nice way to accept the initial hash.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is slightly hacky, because [] isn't the hash constructor; it's a factory method. So, there's no real clean way to get private scope to the new hash.

You can do something like this:

class NewHash < Hash
  def self.[](hash_values, backend = nil)
    super(hash_values).tap do |hash|
      hash.instance_variable_set("@backend", backend)
    end
  end
end

This requires the use of instance_variable_set, which is generally considered smelly, but it works. An alternate would be to create public accessors:

class NewHash < Hash
  attr_accessor :backend
  def self.[](hash_values, backend = nil)
    super(hash_values).tap do |hash|
      hash.backend = backend
    end
  end
end

This, of course, is public, so if you're trying to hide it, the smellier first version might be better.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I think I like the first option better, since it limits any "hackyness" to the factory method, rather than creating an object with unnecessarily public variables forever. –  Stefan Jun 13 '13 at 12:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.