Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A simple yet annoying one - I am tryign to set an input[type=text] width by using absolute positioning (ie right:10px;left:10px) yet I cant get it to play ball.

Does anyone have a solution to kick it into shape?

share|improve this question
    
What does the surrounding HTML look like? What happens? What browsers have you tried it in? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 10 '09 at 15:09
    
You can use both left and right on most tags in IE 7 and up - though it is looking increasingly like you cant on input. I was hoping the it would at least "work" without any JS but no great loss. Thanks for your help (and testing!!) –  Ad Taylor Nov 10 '09 at 15:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Actually, what you're doing works fine. You just need to remember to set the parent element's position as well.

<div>
   <input type="text">
</div>

Then CSS it:

div {
    width: 400px;
    position: relative;
}
input {
    position: absolute;
    left: 5px;
    right: 5px;
}

This would result in the input box being 390px.

If you set the div to be flexible, then the input box would be too.

edit: seems to only work in Chrome, so you'd need to put the input inside another element. This works in FF and IE too:

<div id="parent">
    <div><input type="text"></div>
</div>

with this CSS:

#parent {
    position: relative;
    width: 400px;
}
  #parent div {
      position: absolute;
      left: 5px;
      right: 5px;
  }
    #parent div input {
        width: 100%;
    }

This has the expected effect. A bit hack-ish, maybe...

share|improve this answer

What you are trying to do can't be done that way, as far as I know. One of the values (left or right) should suffice for the position, then you just have to set width and height.

share|improve this answer
    
This is partially true; Internet Explorer 7- (probably version 8 as well) does not accept both a left: and right: CSS property, whereas other browsers render it fine. –  Duroth Nov 10 '09 at 15:13
    
firefox 3.5.5 sure doesn't accept it either, after a quick test –  David Hedlund Nov 10 '09 at 15:17
1  
Setting both left and right works on normal elements (eg, <div>) and is incredibly useful. jsfiddle.net/kFx4D It's frustrating that this doesn't work for <input> elements. –  gilly3 Nov 25 '13 at 19:48

As Marco said, you simply cannot do it that way. If you don't know the width of the page, you'd have to use javascript to achieve that effect:

$('#myInput').css({ right: 10, position: 'absolute', width: $(document).width() - 20 })
share|improve this answer

The css positioning doesn't work quite how you want it to. All it does is set it's position relative to it's parent. The key is that (with most browsers) you only get to specify one of left/right, and one of top/bottom.

You can set the width of the input to 100%, then set the padding-left to 10px and the padding-right to 10px of the parent container of the input. That should give you want you want.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should fire up your IDE and test this out. Setting position:absolute along with both left and right will actually cause the element to stretch so as to be the specified length from the left side and the right side. –  peirix Nov 11 '09 at 7:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.